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Fujinon new 12x28 vs Canon IS (1 Viewer)

Binastro

Well-known member
Hi Juan and welcome.

Basically, what is the verdict?
Is the Fujinon 16x28 better or worse than the Canon 12x36MKIII?
Terrestrially or for astronomy?

Is that your telescope in the YouTube introduction?

Regards,
B.
 

juanmorog

Member
Hi Juan and welcome.

Basically, what is the verdict?
Is the Fujinon 16x28 better or worse than the Canon 12x36MKIII?
Terrestrially or for astronomy?

Is that your telescope in the YouTube introduction?

Regards,
B.

Hi Binastro, I bought the Fujinon but I still do not have it, when I receive it I will make a small comparison, the YouTube video is not mine, the author says that it looks very good but it is not very bright for astronomy
 

juanmorog

Member
Hi again,today I received the Fujinon 16x28 and I only needed thirty minutes to put them back in the box and return them.
The first thing I have put to my measure the inter pupillary distance and I have adjusted the diopters: and I observe first that I do not find a comfortable position of my eyes with the dark circles, second the stabilization has a very annoying movement from right to left (it does not stabilize correctly, and I don't think my unit is a lemon as you say, it just has a poor stabilization).
Third, the optical quality is a bit fair and not clear as my Canon 12x36 lll.
The Canon is very sharp and has a stabilization I would say that from remarkable to outstanding, you simply adjust it, you put your eyes in the glasses and you can see that everything is still and appreciate details, it is like watching TV.
In short, I get the impression that there is no brand that can make shadow on the subject of stabilized binoculars.
When I get my refund I may go for the Canon 14x32 because I think I will not go wrong.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Thank you Juan for your comments.

Even Canon IS binoculars can be poor on occasions, but I would say I have had about 85% success with about ten units.

Regards,
B.
 

juanmorog

Member
A couple of questions: ¿is a Canon 18x50 is good today?, and about the stabilizer button: ¿should it be pressed like 12x36lll or pressed once and it is already activated? thanks
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Juan,

My 18x50 IS is almost 20 years old and has worked almost perfectly all this time.
If the button is pressed it stays on for about 5 or 6 minutes.
It shows some elongated coloured stars if the stabilizer is near the end of its range, but I switch off and switch on again after the image is central, It takes two seconds.

However, I don't know how a new 18x50 IS works or whether it has modified IS.
Mine seems to be a very good example.

Some Canon IS binoculars don't like lithium batteries. I use white Eneloops or lithium throwaways.
Some Canon IS could not take slightly larger Eneloop Pros as the chambers were not big enough. This problem should be cured now.

B.
 

juanmorog

Member
Juan,

My 18x50 IS is almost 20 years old and has worked almost perfectly all this time.
If the button is pressed it stays on for about 5 or 6 minutes.
It shows some elongated coloured stars if the stabilizer is near the end of its range, but I switch off and switch on again after the image is central, It takes two seconds.

However, I don't know how a new 18x50 IS works or whether it has modified IS.
Mine seems to be a very good example.

Some Canon IS binoculars don't like lithium batteries. I use white Eneloops or lithium throwaways.
Some Canon IS could not take slightly larger Eneloop Pros as the chambers were not big enough. This problem should be cured now.

B.

Thanks friend, maybe I will go for the 18x50 to see the livery of the planes that pass over my house from uk to Canary Islands: t: and keep my 12x36, they could be a good combo
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Juan,
Any Canon IS binocular is good for aircraft spotting.

However, I tend to use just my eyes at up to 6,000ft, 2kms.
Or 10x25 Docter well worn binocular.

I normally just take a photo with the 2007 Canon A720 IS camera.
Individual aircraft numbers are visible at 8,000ft but a bridge camera would be needed for higher.
Individual numbers would be very difficult at 37,000ft.

A Zeiss 20x60S would be very good but heavy.

I used to follow the V bombers up to 400km distance near the Scottish borders with a 75mm astro refractor and 80x filar micrometer eyepiece.
The B36 ten engined bombers were really something, and the B47s numerous.

But I think a Canon 18x50IS is a good way to go.
I hope it is a good example.

B.
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
Binastro,

Hope you and others don't mind a small diversion. If you were observing B-36s and B-47s in Southern England between June 1955 and January 1956, you may have been looking at planes on which my father was flying as a radar mechanic. We were stationed at Lakenheath (spelling?) at the time. I was six months old so don't remember much. My father's favorite off duty activity was watching ducks on the Thames. We still have number of pictures of the beautiful area - but many more pictures of the ducks.

Back on topic, Love the Canon 12x36 IS III.

Cheers,

Mike
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Hi Mike,

I got my 3 inch refractor I think in 1956 or 1957.
But I had the Broadhurst Clarkson 25-40x55 brass and leather spotting scope in 1956,
Before that I think I used my eyes although I had an 11x25 spotter in 1952, although I lost this. I found possibly the same one in a shop about ten years ago.

Lakenheath and Mildenhall are still active I think.
Manston was another hotbed of activity.

The B36s were enormous and had a large crew. The B47s were my favourite. Both flew much lower than the V bombers.
Perhaps 35,000ft as opposed to 50,000ft to 60,000ft.
All were easy to identify with unaided eyes when they flew above.

These aircraft were in the air 24 hours a day ready to act.

I liked the Canberra, which we inspected as cadets although I never flew in one. Only Chipmunks maybe from Canada.

These were frightening times, but somehow life was simpler.
We had a 9 inch T.V. about 1950.
And a gas fridge that worked for 30 years.
A gramophone also.
I did film processing in a cupboard under the stairs with a gnome enlarger.
And a number 9 Meccano set. No 10 was just too expensive.
I built a clock, which kept lousy time.
Also a model railway set.
There was killer smog from coal fires.

We had a garden and fed the birds. I found a Woodcock hidden in the bushes.
Sparrows were common, but I don't see them now.
Since the tree fell down about two weeks ago there are no small birds here at all.

The Canon IS binoculars came much later, about the year 2000.
My first binocular was a Charles Frank Nipole 7x23 in the 1960s.

Regards,
B.
 

Nixterdemus

Well-known member
I cannot speak for the Canon, but I did note a few days ago the Fuji 12x28 IS for sale on Amazon. Used very good was the description. Small mark on body up front missing strap & belt clip. Comes in original packaging. Three hundred und seventy simoleons. Why not, eh? Price seemed right as new goes for 549 USD.

They came in today. They never came w\belt clip and the strap along w\everything that was supposed to be supplied arrived. Lens cloth, warranty card, ocular covers, owners manual, nylon "case" & CR2 battery already installed.

SN 00399XX. Focus close to infinity CW. That's a plus. Colour, esp from a 12x28, isn't going to wow anyone, but the detail w\IS is spectacular. The CR2 is old tech & it would've been nice had they incorporated the slightly longer\larger, 60% more capacity & far more readily available CR123.

The little Fujinon is light w\small FOV & smaller EP. You can view\focus w\o IS activated. In holding the bin your index finger manipulates the IS on\off whilst middle finger works focus.

Low & fast tight turning swallows were a challenge; not only to follow but also in focusing as they can cover a lot of territory quickly.

I generally use Nikon MONARCH 5 16x56 to peek inside the mailbox, from the comfort of the house, to check for mail. It always amazed me how I could see inside of the dark box and recognize the back panel. At 4x and 1.2mm EP less the IS did not disappoint.

I scrutinized the wood detail in the stub left of a splintered limb high in an old oak. As if tripod mounted though less than a pound in weight.

It doesn't have that dripping w\colour saturated Kodachrome feeling and I didn't expect as much. [when I bought the last model Conquest w\Abbe-Koenig prisms the hue to me seemed artificially enhanced compared to less expensive bins w\which I was familiar]

Did I mention how much it kicks arse on detail?

The Nikons also were from beyond the great red wall of China. I picked then up from O.P. for not much more than I paid for these.

So far so good.

ETA: Star test didn't wow me either, but I didn't expect that to be a strong suite for the little bins. Looking as straight up as possible the view was stabilised though I could not balance less than a pound of optics at that angle. Due in part to being a product of the 50's and not a contortionist. Muscles in the back of me neck are killin' me this morn.

Anywho that attempt left me w\drunken sailor\guy on a small boat entire view rolling movement though w\o tremor. I've been switching IS on as needed, off when not. It's my way of saying the battery. I'm the guy that fills up the tank w\petrol leaving the engine running. In the ninth yr, at over 100K mi, that equates to many saved turns on the starter.

I decided to hold the bins upside down as I've yet to mount the strap. Within a few minutes they powered down. However, they do not power up when I bring them back up to bear. Why would they when not powered except that entails turning then off then back on, two-step back\forth movement, to come back online. Of course I'd rather power up\down manual I only worry about the life cycle of the switch.

For an entry level terrestrial viewing IS bin that is very compact lightweight middle of the road 12X it would appear to be a winner. Any less power wouldn't be appreciated by most. You need the 12X viewed w\IS off then on to see the diff in detail. Likewise the 28mm objectives are small, yet if you go for better view\more EP you sacrifice portability.

The view is very relaxing. The one thing I noticed were heat waves. Temps have been low as of late combined w\uncharacteristically low humidity. Viewing w\IS off I didn't notice light-moderate heat waves looking across the street. When I kicked the IS on they were very noticeable. Unstabalised I could not see them.

I'd like to see the price at 450USD ...

ETA II: To be fair I have railed against IS in the past. I felt the cost exorbonate and w\early Canons anyway once the IS is on the fritz the bin is naught save paperweight. [under the assumption that cost of repair if available could not justify compared to new replacement monetarily] Time will tell on the modest Fuji. At least if IS fails the Fuji can still be employed as a relatively compact 12x28.

Used battery slipped into sleep mode at 4:45. Perhaps that is an indication of remaining battery reserve. W\eye cups fully extended I can rest the bin on brow, have edge of cups on face or back up a mite more for comfortable view. I do not wear spectacles.

I approve of the body w\focus as separate from IP adjustment. No pressure from hands, when securing bins, on setting. Since eye placement is premium on small EP it is mandatory to have a secured setting.
 
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