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"FUMMARD" (2 Viewers)

John Marshall

Well-known member
Can anyone please help?. I understand the "fummard" is a known Lincolnshire slang word for a obnoxious smell. However a friend of mine has advised me that a "fummard" was a 18th. century fenland mammal of the stoat/weasel type but was larger and of heavier build. Having checked several outlets for information I cannot find any reference. Do we have a member on the forum who has the answer.
 

Darren Oakley-Martin

________________
afraid I can't tell you John, but what I can tell you is that 'fummard' is a 'googlewhack', which are as rare as, well, fummards are these days. Lovely word though! Hope there's an etymologist (?)out there who can help you.
 

SimonC

Still listing - I'll capsize one day
Darrenom said:
afraid I can't tell you John, but what I can tell you is that 'fummard' is a 'googlewhack', which are as rare as, well, fummards are these days. Lovely word though! Hope there's an etymologist (?)out there who can help you.
ahh, not a true Googlewhack I'm afraid Darren!
1, It's not underlined in the blue bar (meaning it isn't in the Dictionary) &
2, A proper googlewhack requires two words (both in the dictionary!)

;)

For more information on the rules of googlewhacking, see here ;)
 

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robinm

Registered User
On the web I found the expression "Fogo as a fummard" which means "Stinks".

This could fit in with idea of it being the fenland mammal which my have smelt unpleasant.;)
 

John Marshall

Well-known member
I have already tried the search engine Robinm, and found the "fogo" definition, also I could not find any trace in dictionaries. Possibly some old mammal books may throw some light on this.
 

birdman

Орнитол&
Anyone considered that Fummard and Fulmar might be etymologically the same???

Foul-mouthed (ie bad breath)
 

John Marshall

Well-known member
Thanks for all your replies. I have now been informed from a reliable source that the term 'fummard' was used in 18th century Lincolnshire from the fens that this was the local term for Polecat. Sounds like a good old Lincolnshire slang word!!!.
 
Fummard

Now then
(NB Lincolnshire greeting; similar to "Hello" in civilized parts of the country)

As a yellerbelly, I can confirm that a "fummard" is/was the polecat.

Apologies for taking so long to respond - the pony express doesn't get through Lincs very often.

The local variation on the phrase (much used by my dad during my teenage years, although I blamed "Old Spice"!) was "You smell like a buck fummard"

Hope this was some use - if not, at least your discussion led me to this great site.

Cheers me owd mucker
Evo
 

John Marshall

Well-known member
Now me owd mucker Fatoldgit,

Nice hearing from a old buck fummard. Welcome from a Wash yellerbelly to a Lincoln mucker, Nice to have you on Bird Forum. I am sure you will enjoy your time here with splendid muckers. Hope you come to see our Montis at Kirton Marsh before the watchpoint closes.

Regards John
 

caz147

New member
thank you

Can anyone please help?. I understand the "fummard" is a known Lincolnshire slang word for a obnoxious smell. However a friend of mine has advised me that a "fummard" was a 18th. century fenland mammal of the stoat/weasel type but was larger and of heavier build. Having checked several outlets for information I cannot find any reference. Do we have a member on the forum who has the answer.

i would just like to say a big thank you for this as my nanna used to say to people that they smelt like a fummard and when i asked what one was she said she would tell me when i was older but she passed away but then my mum started saying it and the same happened again but she used to say my nanna died without telling her so this has put a big smile on my face as now i can actually tell my daughter she stinks like a fummard and actually know what it means. so once again a big thank you
 

John Lincoln

New member
United Kingdom
I'm from(deepest, darkest) Lincolnshire, and it is a common enough saying (we don't see it as slang, it's in everyday language to us) "Stinks like a fummard" according to my father a fummard was a cross between a ferret and a polecat, and just about the smelliest animal ever devised by man. However, for rabbiting it was dogs dangly bits! fetch rabbits out like no other animal. The rabbits could small the thing a mile off and just did a runner straight out into the purse net.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
thank you



i would just like to say a big thank you for this as my nanna used to say to people that they smelt like a fummard and when i asked what one was she said she would tell me when i was older but she passed away but then my mum started saying it and the same happened again but she used to say my nanna died without telling her so this has put a big smile on my face as now i can actually tell my daughter she stinks like a fummard and actually know what it means. so once again a big thank you
Here's an example of that phrase being used, sixth line from bottom of the main text.


And here is a local 'lingo' guide which comfirms 'fummard' to be a Polecat.

 

JaneN

New member
United Kingdom
Can anyone please help?. I understand the "fummard" is a known Lincolnshire slang word for a obnoxious smell. However a friend of mine has advised me that a "fummard" was a 18th. century fenland mammal of the stoat/weasel type but was larger and of heavier build. Having checked several outlets for information I cannot find any reference. Do we have a member on the forum who has the answer.
I grew up on a Lincolnshire farm & remember the saying 'Phew, it smells like a buck fummard " I was told a fummard was a weasel.Interesting!
 

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