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Fungi for id please (1 Viewer)

regor

Well-known member
Please can anyone help with an id for the attached fungi. From a Worcestershire mixed woodland.
3 and 4 are the same specimen.
Thanks
 

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Last edited:

Trichia

Well-known member
Here goes....

1 - Psathyrella sp.
2 - Lactarius aurantiacus
3 & 4 - Agaricus sp. (Maybe A.impudicus?)
5 - Tricholoma fulvum

Cheers,
Nick
 

Trichia

Well-known member
In your defence, Roger, these are quite tough!

The black gills of #1 narrow it down to Psathyrella/Agaricus/Lacrymaria/Panaeolus and a few others. Panaeolus generally are restricted to dung or fertilised grassland and the other two are chunky things. Psathyrella are tricky and even seasoned mycologists quite often struggle with them.

If you had broken the gills of #2 you would have known it was a Milkcap.

The pointers for #3/4 are dark gills+free gills+floppy ring+growing on soil

#5 is difficult because the gills are often deceptively dark for a mushroom that'll actually give you a white spore print.

Cheers,
Nick
 

regor

Well-known member
Thanks for the breakdown of the logic used to come to an id, Nick. Very educational. It also highlights the value of having an expert like yourself on hand, no matter how many books I consult.
My original guesses were:

1. No idea
2. A Russula
3&4 An Agaricus species (|;|)
5. Plums and Custard (despite there being no pines nearby!)

Roger
 

Trichia

Well-known member
These aren't so far off the mark!

Lactarius and Russula are in the same family and share many of the same characteristics (ecology, habit, spore colour, texture of flesh, microscopic features).

The genus name of Plums and Custard literally means 'looks like a Tricholoma' (Tricholomopsis) so I think you can be excused of confusing the two.

Cheers,
Nick
 

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