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goatsucker from the US (1 Viewer)

Hi, this is a nightjar from Sept, from Denver (?). It was posted on a friend's website, saying it is a "Night Hawk". I'm pretty sure it isn't a Common Nighthawk, but since I have no experience with American Caprimulgiformes I'm a bit lost here. Looks like a Common Poorwill to me, with a much-too-long tail... Any ideas? Cheers, Axel
 

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opisska

Jan Ebr
Poland
I will not dare to ID American Nightjars for others, but I have to say that I have never heard about them being called goatsuckers - and now, thanks to you, I have, I have read the story about it and my life is a little bit richer :)
 
I will not dare to ID American Nightjars for others, but I have to say that I have never heard about them being called goatsuckers - and now, thanks to you, I have, I have read the story about it and my life is a little bit richer :)
In German they (the whole family) are called "Ziegenmelker" (literally "goat milkers"). Sibley uses "goatsuckers" in his field guide, with two groups contained therein: nighjars and nighthawks :)
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
I agree that the tail looks a bit long, but I'm pretty sure there's nothing else it could be other than Common Poorwill.

Here are links to two eBird photos (Macaulay Library) showing tails almost as long as the OP bird.

 
I agree that the tail looks a bit long, but I'm pretty sure there's nothing else it could be other than Common Poorwill.

Here are links to two eBird photos (Macaulay Library) showing tails almost as long as the OP bird.

Thanks for commenting and for the example pics.
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
In German they (the whole family) are called "Ziegenmelker" (literally "goat milkers"). Sibley uses "goatsuckers" in his field guide, with two groups contained therein: nighjars and nighthawks :)
Caprimulgus means "goat milker" :)
I read something many years ago that suggested the name originated from them occurring next to where cattle was kept due to the abundance of insects in those places.
 

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