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Golden Eagles? Loch Lomond, Scotland (Edit: Just buzzards, it seems!) (1 Viewer)

Will K

Too well-known member
United Kingdom
I went birdwatching on the banks of Loch Lomond a few days ago. I took my Nikon P1000 and NL Pure 12x42, hoping to see some golden eagles. I think my wish came true whilst walking through a forestry reserve just north of Tarbet, but I'm not certain. Can someone confirm the pics? Thanks!

I saw four of these birds in total that afternoon. It was a day to remember!

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How did you manage to edit the title? It's something I'd want to do as well.
It is possible to change thread titles if you click the 'edit' button for the first post. However, I have noticed that the 'edit' button can disappear sometimes; I guess that can happen if the thread is too old.
 
The buzzards I have seen in the USA all have a two tone colored wing on the bottom.
It's very easy to tell. It's a gray and black. Almost like a stripe down the middle of the wing. But better called two tone.
I posted a pic of one from the US that is very easy to distinguish.
But in some parts of the world it is not that well defined.
This is a very easy way to teach kids the difference between a buzzard and other birds. (In the US)
 

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The views I was getting here are pretty silhouetted, so its hard to get a good look at the colours. The outline is the main thing, I guess.
 
The buzzards I have seen in the USA all have a two tone colored wing on the bottom.
It's very easy to tell. It's a gray and black. Almost like a stripe down the middle of the wing. But better called two tone.
I posted a pic of one from the US that is very easy to distinguish.
But in some parts of the world it is not that well defined.
This is a very easy way to teach kids the difference between a buzzard and other birds. (In the US)
The birds you're calling buzzards in this case are more widely known as Turkey Vultures. The birds we call buzzards (like the Common Buzzard in this thread) are only distantly related to your Turkey Vultures and very closely related to your Red-tailed Hawks
 
With photos you can count the "fingers" - the primaries that project out from the wingtips - Eagles will have six, Buteos will have five.

My rule-of-thumb though is if I think it might be an Eagle, it probably isn't - because Eagles are so distinctive that when you do finally see one it is unmistakable.
In Scotland we had to get to some pretty remote parts of the Highlands to see Golden Eagle.
 
The buzzards I have seen in the USA all have a two tone colored wing on the bottom.
It's very easy to tell. It's a gray and black. Almost like a stripe down the middle of the wing. But better called two tone.
I posted a pic of one from the US that is very easy to distinguish.
But in some parts of the world it is not that well defined.
This is a very easy way to teach kids the difference between a buzzard and other birds. (In the US)
Buck, those are Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura), colloquially called "Buzzards" here in America. In Europe though, "Buzzard" is a generic name for the Buteos, the most common of which (Buteo buteo) is simply called Buzzard.
 
Yes, that's why i mentioned USA . Still a very good way to get kids interested in identification.
Sorry I'm not real familiar with international birds. Although I have seen several Bustards from Europe.
 
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