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Hawk Seen In New England this week (1 Viewer)

CurtMorgan

Well-known member
This raptor was seen in Portland ME this week. Someone suggested that this bird was from Central or South America, but what do you think it is?
 

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fugl

Well-known member
Young goshawk. Note the thick legs, whitish eyebrow streak, buffy heavily streaked underparts, stocky build.
 

Lisa W

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
I see you have the ID, just wanted to say what a beautiful picture of this fellow. Looks like he has a full crop.
 

P.Sunesen

Well-known member
Young goshawk. Note the thick legs, whitish eyebrow streak, buffy heavily streaked underparts, stocky build.

"Don't know much biology.........
but I do know........"

how the nominate Gos looks.

And it certainly wouldn't show two different feather generations of the same streaked/juvenile type of underside feathers at any one time.

Here we see both bleached and whitish, old ones, as well as more buffish, fresher, but IDENTICALLY patterned ones, on the same bird!

And is it normal to see that many NEWLY emerged, dark slate-coloured wing coverts as early as December on a normal 1cy Northern Goshawk in December?

And is it normal for juvenile Northern Gos to have a brown iris?

And is the (longish) bill shape alright for A. gentilis?

Help needed from New World Gos-Nerds....,

Peter
 
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Microtus

Maryland USA (he/him)
Supporter
United States
Idle question, or not; It's not the juvenile/immature Great Black-Hawk that's been in nearby Maine?
 

Kratter

Well-known member
This Great Black Hawk was initially seen on South Padre Island in Texas, the first ABA record. The same individual showed up a month or so later in Maine(!!!) where it has moved about for several months. Where next?
 

ceasar

Well-known member
This Great Black Hawk was initially seen on South Padre Island in Texas, the first ABA record. The same individual showed up a month or so later in Maine(!!!) where it has moved about for several months. Where next?

How can it be determined that it is the same bird?

On another note; based of the pictures of it feeding on squirrels, it seems to have plenty of food available to survive the winter.

Here are a number of pictures of juvenile Goshawks from the website of the Canadian Peregrine Association:

http://www.peregrine-foundation.ca/raptors/Goshawk.html


http://www.peregrine-foundation.ca/raptors/Hawks/goshawkJune26th2005a.html



Bob
 
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rkj

Well-known member
This Great Black Hawk was initially seen on South Padre Island in Texas, the first ABA record. The same individual showed up a month or so later in Maine(!!!) where it has moved about for several months. Where next?

Great Black Hawk has previously, going back, I think, to the 1970s, been reported in south Florida. The origin of any of these birds is surely questionable.
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
There's a relief! When I looked at this yesterday it had been confidently identified as Goshawk + as a UK based birder seeing them in UK + Europe (never saw one while in North America) I would never have thought it looked like one, so pleased to see it being reidentified as a bird I'm not familiar with!
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
I immediately thought it looked way to brown underneath for Gos, certainly the ones I see. The streaks are not rounded or broad enough for juve Gos either.
 

Silverwolf

Well-known member
Ha, my first reaction to this was "that doesn't look like coop or sharpie" followed by "well guess it has to be a goshawk then, nothing else around". My gut was not happy with anything about the bird but what else could it be!? I guess the gut instinct was right here. When Microtus suggested great black-hawk that was an immediate "doh" moment for me.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
How can it be determined that it is the same bird?

Bob

Well I don't know who looked at those two underwing shots and decided they were the same cos to me they're not?

The first bird also has barred trousers, should they be visible in the OP?
 

Birdbrain22

Well-known member
Late to the party... but I immediately knew this was the somewhat famous Great Black Hawk in currently hanging around Portland, ME. Looks nothing like a Goshawk to me. I have not been able to make it up there as it is about a 6.5 hour drive and not really been able to go that far. But have been following the recent sightings... was not seen on Fri 12/7, but was seen again today 12/8.
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Well I don't know who looked at those two underwing shots and decided they were the same cos to me they're not?

The first bird also has barred trousers, should they be visible in the OP?

Sorry, looks the same to me ... ;)

Bear in mind too it's over a month apart, and it won't have held all its primaries exactly the same width distance/overlapping/apart/plane for the camera(men) for the photoshoots. Think the trousers prob aren't showing in the op either.
 
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