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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

HBW-Passerines Peru (1 Viewer)

Maffong

Well-known member
Hello folks,
together with a bunch of other birders I'll be visiting Peru in next August. I'll be having the Princeton Peru Field guide and a checklist from the HBW Alive with me. But since the passerine section of HBW Alive won't be updated until the publishing of the HBW Checklist Passerine Volume I guess that list won't be very up to date. Maybe you can help me compile what songbird species of the region have been split or need description yet.

Thanks in advance!

Sincerely Maffong
 

James Lowther

Well-known member
that's a *big* question!
further to Niels' suggestion, the IOC list is great for this purpose as it is very up-to-date, includes more potential splits than most other checklists (including on the proposed splits page) and also lists distributions for all subspecies.
but there is no substitute for hard work, you will have to do the research yourself!
cheers,
James
 

Maffong

Well-known member
Thanks for that list, quite helpful! But how about the undescribed species? Is there somewhere a site or sheet were they are compiled?

Sincerely Maffong
 

lewis20126

Well-known member
that's a *big* question!
further to Niels' suggestion, the IOC list is great for this purpose as it is very up-to-date, includes more potential splits than most other checklists (including on the proposed splits page) and also lists distributions for all subspecies.
but there is no substitute for hard work, you will have to do the research yourself!
cheers,
James

I suggest you use the "groups" concept in Clements (or other?). I think most of the BLI non-passerine splits were already identified "groups" in Clements so were not surprises in that sense.

cheers, alan
 

Tom Schulenberg

Active member
Maybe you can help me compile what songbird species of the region have been split or need description yet.g

The text in the Peru guide is concise (if not terse). It is is attentive to geographic variation, however, although it doesn't do the user the favor of going on to say anything like "If split, should be called ....". Nonetheless, paying attention in the guide to which subspecies were selected for illustration or mention, and to discussions of geographic variation in vocalizations, will go a long way towards flagging potential splits or, in some cases, undescribed taxa.

Putting provisional names on these birds is the next step. As others have suggested, the "groups" in the eBird/Clements checklist will catch many potential splits, with suggested English names and the associated scientific names.

Undescribed species are the hardest to trace. A few of these are discussed in the Peru guide, although I don't recall that the word "undescribed" is associated with any of them. The BirdForum thread, again as others have suggested, is one place to search for such species in Peru. Another place to look is the eBird/Clements checklist. Use the eBird/Clements Checklist 6.9 spreadsheet, the file combines all taxa from the Clements Checklist and all additional categories from the eBird taxonomy, with brief range descriptions for all taxa. Here, search under the category "form" for birds occurring in Peru. "Form" is a term used in eBird for a variety of things that do not fit easily into a traditional classification or into any other eBird category, such as call types in crossbills or undescribed species - which, lacking a formal name, don't appear at all in most checklists.

I encourage all members of this forum to review the forms in this spreadsheet, with an eye to our roster of undescribed species globally, and to alert Marshall Iliff or me of any that we have overlooked - as I am sure that we have (!).
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
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