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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Hello from Northeastern NJ, across from NYC (2 Viewers)

cytherian

Active member
United States
Last year I had the opportunity to take an apartment with a close friend in a high-rise building in NJ. There are numerous such apartment complexes along the Palisades bluffs overlooking the Hudson River. There's a park nearby and occasionally one can spot birds of prey. So I started making time to watch for them from my balcony, in their active seasons. Prior to this most of my bird watching would take place on Eastern Long Island in the summer. So many shore birds like swans, egrets (small & great), herrons, cormorants, terns, sandpipers, plovers, and many varieties of seagulls. Nuthatches, sparrows, finches, cardinals, warblers, orioles, etc. would come to the window bird feeder. But the most pleasure I got was providing nectar for hummingbirds, getting to see these amazing creatures up close. Studying them I'd recognize certain feeding/perching behaviors as well as markings that convinced me some of them were repeat visitors across several years. Anyway, that's about the extent of my birding. Looking forward to learning more about the hobby from folks here! :giggle:
 
Hi cytherian and a warm welcome to you from all the Staff and Moderators.

I'm sure you will enjoy it here and I look forward to hearing your news.
 
Hi, welcome to the forum. I think you will find us a friendly and helpful group.
 
Last year I had the opportunity to take an apartment with a close friend in a high-rise building in NJ. There are numerous such apartment complexes along the Palisades bluffs overlooking the Hudson River. There's a park nearby and occasionally one can spot birds of prey. So I started making time to watch for them from my balcony, in their active seasons. Prior to this most of my bird watching would take place on Eastern Long Island in the summer. So many shore birds like swans, egrets (small & great), herrons, cormorants, terns, sandpipers, plovers, and many varieties of seagulls. Nuthatches, sparrows, finches, cardinals, warblers, orioles, etc. would come to the window bird feeder. But the most pleasure I got was providing nectar for hummingbirds, getting to see these amazing creatures up close. Studying them I'd recognize certain feeding/perching behaviors as well as markings that convinced me some of them were repeat visitors across several years. Anyway, that's about the extent of my birding. Looking forward to learning more about the hobby from folks here! :giggle:
Hello. I just joined, too. I know the buildings you mean. We used to live in Washington Heights back in the day (and do our shopping in Teaneck when the GWB toll was $4) and our daughter and family currently live in Fair Lawn.
 
Hi! I'm new here also and I went to Fort Lee HS, now living in S Jersey, so I know where you are talking about. Welcome! There should be abundant peregrines in those palisades.
 
Last year I had the opportunity to take an apartment with a close friend in a high-rise building in NJ. There are numerous such apartment complexes along the Palisades bluffs overlooking the Hudson River. There's a park nearby and occasionally one can spot birds of prey. So I started making time to watch for them from my balcony, in their active seasons. Prior to this most of my bird watching would take place on Eastern Long Island in the summer. So many shore birds like swans, egrets (small & great), herrons, cormorants, terns, sandpipers, plovers, and many varieties of seagulls. Nuthatches, sparrows, finches, cardinals, warblers, orioles, etc. would come to the window bird feeder. But the most pleasure I got was providing nectar for hummingbirds, getting to see these amazing creatures up close. Studying them I'd recognize certain feeding/perching behaviors as well as markings that convinced me some of them were repeat visitors across several years. Anyway, that's about the extent of my birding. Looking forward to learning more about the hobby from folks here! :giggle:
Hello Cytherian,

Welcome from just east of the Hudson. If I step out my building's front door, I can see the heights across the river in New Jersey. Even bald eagles manage to fly down the Hudson, past my viewpoint.

Welcome,
Arthur Pinewood
 
Thanks for the welcomes!
Good to hear that there are a few BF members not far from my location. The elevation is a serious advantage for large wingspan bird watching. There are nests scattered all about in the undeveloped patches of land that are scattered about. I hate to think of how much avian habitation was torn down to make way for human habitation.
I have seen hawks and sea eagles, but none bald as yet. I though peregrines might be around but haven't spotted any as yet, because I wasn't looking enough during their peak seasons. I imagine spring is a good time?
 
Welcome from just east of the Hudson. If I step out my building's front door, I can see the heights across the river in New Jersey. Even bald eagles manage to fly down the Hudson, past my viewpoint.
Hi Arthur, great to know you've spotted bald eagles. My location is across from the 80's cross streets. It's interesting to see bird flight patterns. I've spotted some who go sailing clear across the river. Usually they ride a thermal up high enough to make a good glide path across, but I've also seen some do wing flapping for at least 75% of the trip. I once saw a bird make that trip, then insert itself into a flock that was cruising around the NY side of the Hudson, when all of the sudden they all took a sharp turn and started heading south. Within a few minutes, most of the birds had left the area. I wonder if they were all headed for a fishing expedition?
 
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