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HELP, single nested Mourning Dove dehydrated? (1 Viewer)

Pidge

New member
Hey guys, I need some help with a mourning dove situation, as I haven't been able to find any answers online and am desperate.

A mourning dove and her mate constructed a nest outside of our kitchen window, so we got to see them work on the nest on a daily, but by the time the nest was done, it was strange to not ever see them taking 'shifts,' as they normally do. I never really see the mate around, despite the fact that I feel like we should be seeing him and her switching on the nest, I haven't seen any other dove for a few days now, and I don't think she's left the nest either.

I'm hoping that maybe I just haven't conveniently seen them switch, but this is the kitchen window, and you usually hear a mourning dove when it flies by.

I'm worried that the dove might be dehydrated, but I'm not sure what the signs are. Today, and as I'm typing this for like the past hour, the skin on her throat has been bobbing very quickly (sort of like a frog) and i'm not sure if that's a normal breathing technique or if she's dehydrated and in distress. She looks overall fine, her beak isn't gaped open, but her behavior is still concerning me. Please let me know if the throat wiggling is normal or not, and what I should do.
-Thank you
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Hi Pidge and a warm welcome to you from all the Staff and Moderators.

I've moved your post to the Bird Behaviour forum and subscribed you to the thread so you will be advised of any replies and can find it easily.

This hot weather it might be an idea to place some water nearby so they can get a drink and/or bathe.
 

fugl

Well-known member
Mourning Doves normally change shifts only twice a day, the female (who sits all night) being relieved by the male in the mid-morning, and he by her in the late afternoon, so it’s not surprising you haven’t witnessed the change-over. The gular fluttering you mention is a means of dissipating heat in warm weather and is also nothing to worry about.
 

Pidge

New member
Hi fugl, thank you so much for the quick and helpful response, I was so curious about what the throat movement was called as well. I'm also curious, do all mourning dove pair shifts follow the schedule of the male during the day, and female throughout the night?
Many Thanks!
 

fugl

Well-known member
. . .I'm also curious, do all mourning dove pair shifts follow the schedule of the male during the day, and female throughout the night?
Many Thanks!

Yes, I believe so, all successful pairs at least. It’s presumably written into their genes.
 

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