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Help to identify (1 Viewer)

Dezaray

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My children found this bird in our backyard in Coos Bay Oregon USA. We cannot figure out what kind of bird it is or even if it is an adult or a baby.
 

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Hi Dezaray and a warm welcome to you from all the Staff and Moderators.

I've moved your post to the ID forum as I think you're more likely to get the help you need there. I also subscribed you to the thread, so you don't lose track of it.
 
It's a species of nightjar - the choices where you are being common nighthawk and common poorwill. I'd guess the former, but I don't know what (if any) plumage features to key in on, and it's difficult to judge the bird's proportions from these views (the nighthawk's quite elongated, the poorwill relatively dumpy).
 
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Welcome to Birdforum Dezaray. The barred wingtips and square ended tail make it a Common Poorwill. I'm afraid I can't age it though.

Chris
 
The barred wingtips and square ended tail...
The barred 'wingtips' visible here are of course the barred tertials, rather than the actual wing-tips (i.e. the primaries, whose differently-patterned/-coloured barring is entirely hidden underneath the tertials in this photo). The tail-tip is also all but invisible under the folded wing-feathers.
 
The barred 'wingtips' visible here are of course the barred tertials, rather than the actual wing-tips (i.e. the primaries, whose differently-patterned/-coloured barring is entirely hidden underneath the tertials in this photo). The tail-tip is also all but invisible under the folded wing-feathers.

Just making it easier for Dezaray to understand why I chose Poorwill. That the tail tip is almost hidden is enough to see the shape and 'tertials' may not mean a thing to someone who's not used to the topology of avian feather tracts.

Chris
 
That the tail tip is almost hidden is enough to see the shape
I disagree.

'tertials' may not mean a thing to someone who's not used to the topology of avian feather tracts.
Indeed so! Though a non-expert would probably recognise it more easily still as an (apparent) tail than as wing-tips.
Useful to have the tertial-pattern nailed as a feature though. Thanks.
 
A Common Poorwill is an excellent back yard bird! Listen to the second call here - you may have been hearing them at night without realizing the source.
 
My children found this bird in our backyard in Coos Bay Oregon USA. We cannot figure out what kind of bird it is or even if it is an adult or a baby.

Umm... no one else seems to want to bring this up, but ... given this bird's docility, I suspect it is a juvenile. (Often, juvenile birds, especially cryptically-plumaged ones like nightjars, will "freeze" as a defense mechanism). So it may still be receiving some parental care - I trust you put it back where you/they found it?

Peter.
 
Umm... no one else seems to want to bring this up, but ... given this bird's docility, I suspect it is a juvenile. (Often, juvenile birds, especially cryptically-plumaged ones like nightjars, will "freeze" as a defense mechanism). So it may still be receiving some parental care - I trust you put it back where you/they found it?

Peter.

We filler two water bottles with hot water covered it in a towel and placed the bird on the warm towel it had a wound on its stomach that looked like it had been in a fight with a stronger bird. We took it to my dogs vet. From there they tried to identify it as a baby falcon but we won't know until later today what it actually is because it is being sent to a wildlife rescue that saves birds in Bandon OR. If we left it where we found it it would have died. So far it is still alive and doing well. We found it under the back deck on the ground without any nest anywhere.
 
We filler two water bottles with hot water covered it in a towel and placed the bird on the warm towel it had a wound on its stomach that looked like it had been in a fight with a stronger bird. We took it to my dogs vet. From there they tried to identify it as a baby falcon but we won't know until later today what it actually is because it is being sent to a wildlife rescue that saves birds in Bandon OR. If we left it where we found it it would have died. So far it is still alive and doing well. We found it under the back deck on the ground without any nest anywhere.

Thank you for your quick reply :)
 
...my dogs vet. From there they tried to identify it as a baby falcon but we won't know until later today what it actually is because it is being sent to a wildlife rescue that saves birds...
It's not a falcon. There is no question of the ID you've been given here not being correct. Many of the people who answer queries in this forum are far better qualified to identify wild birds than would be almost any vet or wildlife rehabber.
 
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