• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

HELP! Why are there no hummingbirds in my garden:( (1 Viewer)

Redhummer

New member
United States
Can anyone please help. I live in Seymour CT I’ve been feeding hummingbirds for about 4 years seeing around 5 or 6 at a time at its peek. But this year 2024 there are barely no hummers around:( I have lots of red feeders out with fresh sugar water 4-1 ratio daily. And my yard is fully with hummingbird plants from honeysuckle, bee balm, cardinal vine, trumpet vine, Lucifer, cigar plants, salvia, zinna, cosmo, and much much more. I have lots of shrub and trees for them to hide and shelter in too. Any help as to why I’m not seeing any hummers basically would be much appreciated, thanks
 
Hi Redhummer and a warm welcome to you from all the Staff and Moderators. I'm so sorry your hummingbirds have gone missing this summer, that's such a shame; I'm afraid I can't tell you why that might be, though someone will be along to help you before too long.

I'm sure you will enjoy it here and I look forward to hearing your news.
 
Can anyone please help. I live in Seymour CT I’ve been feeding hummingbirds for about 4 years seeing around 5 or 6 at a time at its peek. But this year 2024 there are barely no hummers around:( I have lots of red feeders out with fresh sugar water 4-1 ratio daily. And my yard is fully with hummingbird plants from honeysuckle, bee balm, cardinal vine, trumpet vine, Lucifer, cigar plants, salvia, zinna, cosmo, and much much more. I have lots of shrub and trees for them to hide and shelter in too. Any help as to why I’m not seeing any hummers basically would be much appreciated, thanks
Not sure if this helps or not, but it seems like across CT the sightings of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are slightly down this year. See this comparative bar chart from eBird: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=2020&eyr=2024&bmo=1&emo=12&r=US-CT&spp=rthhum&separateYears=true

I also notice from the chart that June is usually a down month for them with a lot more being seen in July - September, so maybe they'll show up soon.
 
I havent seen quite as many here in south NJ this year either. Some days I see none, some days I see them every hour. I suspect things will ramp up once the newly hatched youngsters start to get out and about.
 
In Santa Barbara, southern California, July through September is the peak of hummingbird activity. We normally have >100 birds at our feeders some evenings during this period. This year has been bleak--I have seen no more than 5 birds at our feeders for the last several months--in other words, this year is dramatically different. When birding "in the wild", I see the same number of hummers as any other year--i.e., a few here and there. Why? No concrete explanation.

Other sugar-eating birds--orioles, grosbeaks, woodpeckers--are at feeders in typical numbers this summer (e.g., 11 Hooded Orioles), altho sparrow numbers were discouragingly low this winter.
 
I havent seen quite as many here in south NJ this year either. Some days I see none, some days I see them every hour. I suspect things will ramp up once the newly hatched youngsters start to get out and about.
Hopefully things will pickup soon when the juvenile are out and about. Seem like a strange year though.
 
In Santa Barbara, southern California, July through September is the peak of hummingbird activity. We normally have >100 birds at our feeders some evenings during this period. This year has been bleak--I have seen no more than 5 birds at our feeders for the last several months--in other words, this year is dramatically different. When birding "in the wild", I see the same number of hummers as any other year--i.e., a few here and there. Why? No concrete explanation.

Other sugar-eating birds--orioles, grosbeaks, woodpeckers--are at feeders in typical numbers this summer (e.g., 11 Hooded Orioles), altho sparrow numbers were discouragingly low this winter.
That’s really strange! Do you think the weather is playing a part and the wildfires in California destroying there habitat?
 
I don't do anything to attract humingbirds but occasionally I would see one whiz by in my yard, but not anymore, haven't seen any for several years, I'm in southern Ontario
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top