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Help with Australian Bird ID - Historic Cased Taxidermy (1 Viewer)

dantheman

Bah humbug
... I think that's just clutching at straw-coloured bills ...

Presumably it is something that's faded, but might require better photos, as at a guess could be lots of things? Presume DNA would be expensive (and would that help if you don't know what comparing to in the first place?)
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Hi Hannah! Just thought Iā€™d jump in here and wish a warm welcome to you from those of us on staff here. Hope to see more of your posts šŸ˜Š. Enjoy!
 

pshute

Well-known member
I can't make this into a Kiskadee and I've seen a few...

Think we have to await better photos
The bill shape looks a better match than Strong-billed Honeyeater to me. The splash of white on the wing and the line of white across the tail might just be reflections on the glass.
 

JWN Andrewes

Poor Judge of Pasta.
I don't know by what mechanism, but it is not unknown for old stuffed birds to end up with unexpectedly yellow bills


I know I've also seen some odd, out of range species thrown into otherwise biogeographically homogenous selections, but didn't find any obvious examples in the very brief search that yielded up the case linked above.

Still looks like a Tyrannid to me.
 
Hi Everyone,

Thanks so much for all of the replies, and the warm welcome to the forum!

Here are a few higher resolution images, I hope that they might help us to identify the mystery bird in question...

Also, just for Sicklebill, I've taken some quick snaps of the other Two Paradise Parrots in the collection. Apologies for the boxes in the background, but I don't have an ideal photography set up in the store unfortunately!

I really appreciate all of your expertise with this, and shows how important the sharing of knowledge can be in the Natural History and/ or Museum field. DSC03725.JPG DSC03726.JPG DSC03727.JPG DSC03728.JPG DSC03735.JPG DSC03737.JPG DSC03738.jpg DSC03745.JPG DSC03746.JPG DSC03744.JPG DSC03754.JPG DSC03751.JPG DSC03753.JPG

Best Wishes,

Hannah
 

rkj

Well-known member
Looks to me like a faded (especially the bill) Great Kiskadee with the taxidermy messed up on the face. I can't see this as any native Australian bird or a scimitar-babbler.
 
Hi rkj and The_Fern, yes I'd agree, it's just super faded!

The beak shape looks right and I can now see the reddish tones left in the wing feathers, albeit very faded.

How odd that it's in with a case of Australian birds though.... perhaps the taxidermist thought 'hmmm.... its just missing something!'

Lets see if everyone else in the thread agrees! :)

Thanks again for all of your help,

Hannah
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
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Barbados
Sorry for being the odd man out here, but I actually think it looks better for lesser kiskadee than for greater, both with bill shape and with overall size (GrKi should be 23-24 cm!).

Niels
 

rkj

Well-known member
Sorry for being the odd man out here, but I actually think it looks better for lesser kiskadee than for greater, both with bill shape and with overall size (GrKi should be 23-24 cm!).
Maybe, but if you stretched it straight, like the Scaly-breasted Lorikeet, it would be about the same length as that bird, which is about right for Great Kiskadee.
 

sicklebill

well-known Cretaceous relic
Australia
Hi rkj and The_Fern, yes I'd agree, it's just super faded!

The beak shape looks right and I can now see the reddish tones left in the wing feathers, albeit very faded.

How odd that it's in with a case of Australian birds though.... perhaps the taxidermist thought 'hmmm.... its just missing something!'

Lets see if everyone else in the thread agrees! :)

Thanks again for all of your help,

Hannah
Thanks very much for this Hannah, the close ups indeed reveal a Kiskadee, but what on earth is it doing in that case? We shall never know! Thank you also for the great shots of Paradise Parrot, extinct since 1926 or thereabouts and a wonderful species to have in the collection.
 

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