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Historical Impossibility? (1 Viewer)

Anthony Morton

Well-known member
Having gone to extraordinary lengths in its search for historical accuracy, the rather racy BBC epic 'Rome' really shot itself in the foot during this week's programme.

In a scene set inside an otherwise authentic-looking Roman villa a cockatiel in a cage was clearly shown, together with what looked and sounded suspiciously like budgerigars in a number of other cages in the same room.

Assuming that the Roman Empire didn't stretch quite as far as Australia, has anyone else noticed any similar historical inaccuracies in other programmes?

Anthony
 

Woody

Well-known member
Anthony Morton said:
Having gone to extraordinary lengths in its search for historical accuracy, the rather racy BBC epic 'Rome' really shot itself in the foot during this week's programme.

In a scene set inside an otherwise authentic-looking Roman villa a cockatiel in a cage was clearly shown, together with what looked and sounded suspiciously like budgerigars in a number of other cages in the same room.

Assuming that the Roman Empire didn't stretch quite as far as Australia, has anyone else noticed any similar historical inaccuracies in other programmes?

Anthony
The constant use of Harris' hawks as falconry birds in almost anything medieaval, ahhrrrghhh!

One of my favourites was watching Henry the eighth, as played by Ray Winston, galloping alongside a barbed wire fence, He He He!

Woody
 

Anthony Morton

Well-known member
Woody said:
The constant use of Harris' hawks as falconry birds in almost anything medieaval, ahhrrrghhh!

One of my favourites was watching Henry the eighth, as played by Ray Winston, galloping alongside a barbed wire fence, He He He!

Woody


Hi Woody,

That's exactly the kind of historical cock-up I was thinking of. Brilliant!

Another of my favourites was the biblical epic where God/Moses/Abraham (sorry, can't think which!) was sitting on the throne with his hands cupped around the ends of the armrests - clearly showing fingers heavily stained with nicotine. Clang! :smoke:

Anthony
 

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Is it a bird? Is it a plane?
Look at any of the Tarzan films, they are littered with all sorts of animal oddities for the African jungle. Indian elephants strike me as the most obvious.

I seem to remember someone on BF commenting about the latest Batman film where a chiffchaff can be clearly heard.

I was also watching last years Last of the summer wine christmas special where they are wandering around in with Father chrismas suits on trying to make themselves heard over the screeching swifts flying above.
 

Tannin

Common; sedentary.
Was it The Party? The immortal Peter Sellers playing an Indian tribesman on the Khyber Pass, circa 1880, sheaking up on a British sentry to cut his throat ..... wearing a shiny new Rolex watch. Of course, that one was part of the script, but delightful nevertheless.
 

KnockerNorton

Well-known member
Few British period dramas (Edwardian, Victorian) are complete without the soundtrack of collared doves popping up somewhere.

Kookaburras calling in just about any jungle scene too. And chimpanzees.
 

kevtubb

Well-known member
Christmas Gaffe

And for a seasonal clanger in the film A Christmas Carol with Patrick Stewart as the lead, the scene where he meets the Ghost of Christmas past complete with snow on the ground you can distinctly hear the sound of Swifts overhead. Swifts in December!
 

walwyn

Here today, gone tomorrow
Look at any of the Tarzan films, they are littered with all sorts of animal oddities for the African jungle. Indian elephants strike me as the most obvious.
Most snakes in films are Indian or Burmese Pythons regardless of which continent the location is meant to be.
 

Edward

Umimmak
Masked Lapwings pop up as background noises in the Lord of the Rings films. Do they have Masked Lapwings in Middle Earth? I'm not sure. Perhaps some Tolkienite could put me straight.

E
 

postcardcv

Super Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Edward said:
Masked Lapwings pop up as background noises in the Lord of the Rings films. Do they have Masked Lapwings in Middle Earth? I'm not sure. Perhaps some Tolkienite could put me straight.

E

of course they did, but it's quite a rarity - the whole destroying the ring thing was just an excuse for a bit of twitching... you know hobbits, avid listers ;)
 

Johnny1

Well-known member
It always amazes me in these "historical" plays and even in some documentary type programmes about ancient Britain how many of them show hunting scenes with Harris Hawks in them.
 

Dimitris

Birdwatcher in Oz
Edward said:
Masked Lapwings pop up as background noises in the Lord of the Rings films. Do they have Masked Lapwings in Middle Earth? I'm not sure. Perhaps some Tolkienite could put me straight.

E

They had three species of Swan in Middle Earth....

http://alt-tolkien.com/r13swans.html


(scroll down the real species to find the fictional...)

Also they had Giant Eagles (New Zealand)

Robins
Songthrushes
Ravens
Kokakos (Clearly heard in the last movie when the elves are leaving)
Saddlebacks etc.

Oh and Bluebirds or Rainbow Buntings or something similar.

Anyone fancy a birding trip to Middle Earth?


Merry X-mas,

Dimitris
 

Curtis Croulet

Well-known member
Probably thousands of movies involving outdoor night scenes, regardless of locale (Europe, Africa), include the sounds of distant Pacific Treefrogs (Hyla regilla), which are found naturally only on the west coast of North America. American popular culture has adopted "ribbit-ribbit" as the standard sound made by frogs, and any movie or TV show showing even a Bullfrog (the large American frog Rana catesbiana) is likely to accompany the scene with "ribbit-ribbit" sounds, even though this sound is characteristic only of the Pacific Treefrog.
 

RecoveringScot

Well-known member
Adey Baker said:
American Robin in Mary Poppins although that's not 'historical' I suppose...

In an episode of 'Columbo' set in New England, Bette Davis. an onithological murderess, claims she was outdoors at the time 'listening to the Nightingales' though I suppose that's geographical, not historical.
 

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