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Historical Impossibility? (1 Viewer)

Curtis Croulet

Well-known member
I had someone in a classical music forum tell me he heard a "yellowhammer" near his home that sounded just like the one in Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony. He lived in Pittsburgh, and I told him it was highly unlikely. He said, "Well, it sounded like a yellowhammer!"
 

Denis J

Well-known member
I watched a remake of Spartacus the other day there is a scene where they are in southern italy at night with a great northern diver calling in the background.
 

angelquasar

Well-known member
Anthony Morton said:
Having gone to extraordinary lengths in its search for historical accuracy, the rather racy BBC epic 'Rome' really shot itself in the foot during this week's programme.

In a scene set inside an otherwise authentic-looking Roman villa a cockatiel in a cage was clearly shown, together with what looked and sounded suspiciously like budgerigars in a number of other cages in the same room.

Assuming that the Roman Empire didn't stretch quite as far as Australia, has anyone else noticed any similar historical inaccuracies in other programmes?

Anthony

Geographical rather than historical but I once clearly heard a red-necked nightjar in an episode of Cadfael.
 

Grampy Bustard

Well-known member
cheshirebirder said:
I'm sure the BBC has some bird tapes it uses to dubb over some of their programmes - bee-eaters calling seems to pop up frequently.
Yes this is a regular, I have heard dozens of times.

Another recent one was the programme on Neanderthal man in the south of France who seemed to be accompanied by Pheasants breaking from cover....I thought they were introduced from the far east by the Romans.....that's Pheasants not Neanderthals
 

Anthony Morton

Well-known member
The various replies have struck another 'wrong' note with me. This time it's the way programme makers frequently use the sound of a vixen screaming to indicate that it's night-time.

One of the best examples of this has to be the 'Midsomer Murders' series, where the cast are often seen wandering about in lightweight summer clothes with a vixen calling loudly in the background.

Hardly correct, as she usually only calls in January and February as her way of indicating to the dog foxes that she is ready for a spot of the old once-a-year vulpine rumpy-pumpy!

HAPPY CHRISTMAS ALL!

Anthony
 

Gill Osborne

Well-known member
Anthony Morton said:
The various replies have struck another 'wrong' note with me. This time it's the way programme makers frequently use the sound of a vixen screaming to indicate that it's night-time.

One of the best examples of this has to be the 'Midsomer Murders' series, where the cast are often seen wandering about in lightweight summer clothes with a vixen calling loudly in the background.

Hardly correct, as she usually only calls in January and February as her way of indicating to the dog foxes that she is ready for a spot of the old once-a-year vulpine rumpy-pumpy!


As a new convert to Midsomer Murders ( never watch much tv normally so I usually miss good programmes and have to wait for them to be repeated LOL ) I've noticed these screaming vixens many times! It's usually followed by a Tawny Owl hooting too! ;)

The Irish programme Ballykissangel used to ALWAYS have Tawny Owls hooting whenever it was dark....yet I'm sure there aren't any Tawnies in Ireland!

One of my all-time favourites though is the film 'Enigma' with Kate Winslet and Dougray Scott. It's set in WW2 ( 1939-45) yet in one scene you can quite clearly hear a Collared Dove cooing away! They didn't arrive in the UK until 1954/1955ish! ;)

It really annoys Neil now when we are watching a film...I have strict instructions to keep my mouth zipped and just enjoy the storyline! :-O

Gill
 

Grampy Bustard

Well-known member
cheshirebirder said:
I'm sure the BBC has some bird tapes it uses to dubb over some of their programmes - bee-eaters calling seems to pop up frequently.
And suspiciously like Willow Warblers in song trhoughout Dances with Wolves this evening.....
 

Colin

Axeman (Retired)
England
I remember a documentary about Eider Ducks. Much of the long shot filming was done way up north in the 'arctic' area but there was a need for close ups of the ducks. This was done at a Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Centre and although the Eider filled the frame and there was no viewable background to give the location away, the sounds in the background included White-faced Whistling Ducks. Even though these have a fairly big world distribution, they do not frequent the same habitats as Eiders as far as I know but they do have a distinctive call. o:D
 

Allen S. Moore

Well-known member
postcardcv said:
of course they did, but it's quite a rarity - the whole destroying the ring thing was just an excuse for a bit of twitching... you know hobbits, avid listers ;)
I remember the eagle(s) rescuing the 2 hobbits from the lava flow towards the end of the Return of the King film last year. Are hobbits very small?
 

Bluetail

Senior Moment
Allen S. Moore said:
I remember the eagle(s) rescuing the 2 hobbits from the lava flow towards the end of the Return of the King film last year. Are hobbits very small?
They are "halflings". And, of course, Middle Earth knew all sorts of species that are beyond the ken of modern man... ;)
 

Sedgley

Bedlington Terrier
Saw a programme recently (can't remember which one) but in order to create a rural/summer atmosphere, every single time an outdoors shot was filmed, a cuckoo call was very clearly heard. In fact it became hilarious after a while.
 

cheshirebirder

Well-known member
Mocha said:
And suspiciously like Willow Warblers in song trhoughout Dances with Wolves this evening.....

There is an american bird that sings just like our willow warbler. I think it's song sparrow but I've not seen song sparrow in the breeding season. Can anyone confirm this or correct me ?
 

alancairns

Well-known member
cheshirebirder said:
There is an american bird that sings just like our willow warbler. I think it's song sparrow but I've not seen song sparrow in the breeding season. Can anyone confirm this or correct me ?

I believe the bird in the movie is a Canyon wren.

Alan
 

cheshirebirder

Well-known member
alancairns said:
I believe the bird in the movie is a Canyon wren.

Alan
Thanks for that. Somone else said that canyon wren sounded like willow warbler . The habitat in " dances with wolves " is prairie so has the song been dubbed on to the film - doesn't look like canyon wren territory?
 

Curtis Croulet

Well-known member
I heard birds that sounded like Canyon Wrens and Cactus Wrens in the film Kingdom of Heaven. Where in Dance With Wolves is the Canyon Wren?
 

alancairns

Well-known member
cheshirebirder said:
Thanks for that. Somone else said that canyon wren sounded like willow warbler . The habitat in " dances with wolves " is prairie so has the song been dubbed on to the film - doesn't look like canyon wren territory?

Canyon wren is found from Southern BC (just), through Eastern Washington and Oregon, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, and points south. I can't remember where Dances with Wolves was set, but anywhere in Western North America south of the 49th would be credible.

That said, I make no doubt taht the bird song was dubbed.

Alan
 

KnockerNorton

Well-known member
Anthony Morton said:
The various replies have struck another 'wrong' note with me. This time it's the way programme makers frequently use the sound of a vixen screaming to indicate that it's night-time.

One of the best examples of this has to be the 'Midsomer Murders' series, where the cast are often seen wandering about in lightweight summer clothes with a vixen calling loudly in the background.

Hardly correct, as she usually only calls in January and February as her way of indicating to the dog foxes that she is ready for a spot of the old once-a-year vulpine rumpy-pumpy!

HAPPY CHRISTMAS ALL!

Anthony


Ah, I just tell myself that it's a calling muntjac now - they can be similar. Stops me throwing stuff at the telly.
 

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