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Hoopoe in Northern Ireland (1 Viewer)

AliCat

Well-known member
United Kingdom
While about 100 hoopoes are recorded in the UK, every year, very few get blown off course as far north and west as Northern Ireland, so when one was spotted in Comber, only a 40 minutes drive from our house, I had to go to try to see it. At first he was way down the bottom of a farm lane and barely visible, but he then flew into the neighbouring cemetery where I and four other lucky enthusiasts were treated to a fabulous display of his crest as he hunted for grubs in the soil.

*we used to see hoopoes when we lived in France, but in the 13 years there I never once got a photo of one. When we returned to NI and I bought my camera my one regret was that I'd never get a photo of a hoopoe. Never say never, I guess!
 

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I live in Bangor and just missed seeing him when I got down to Comber he was gone.
Ooh, how disappointing! We live just outside Portaferry & I know I was lucky to have been there when he wandered about openly in the cemetery. Pure luck & a spur of the moment decision to go & see if I could spot him.
 
While about 100 hoopoes are recorded in the UK, every year, very few get blown off course as far north and west as Northern Ireland, so when one was spotted in Comber, only a 40 minutes drive from our house, I had to go to try to see it. At first he was way down the bottom of a farm lane and barely visible, but he then flew into the neighbouring cemetery where I and four other lucky enthusiasts were treated to a fabulous display of his crest as he hunted for grubs in the soil.

*we used to see hoopoes when we lived in France, but in the 13 years there I never once got a photo of one. When we returned to NI and I bought my camera my one regret was that I'd never get a photo of a hoopoe. Never say never, I guess!
Magic photos. What optics were used for birdwatching?
 
Magic photos. What optics were used for birdwatching?
Thank you, Natan!

Sorry, but I don't have an optic. I was fortunate that when I arrived a man with one had spotted the Hoopoe, which then landed close to us, but I have no idea what it was. My photos were taken on just under 600mm zoom.
 
While about 100 hoopoes are recorded in the UK, every year, very few get blown off course as far north and west as Northern Ireland, so when one was spotted in Comber, only a 40 minutes drive from our house, I had to go to try to see it. At first he was way down the bottom of a farm lane and barely visible, but he then flew into the neighbouring cemetery where I and four other lucky enthusiasts were treated to a fabulous display of his crest as he hunted for grubs in the soil.

*we used to see hoopoes when we lived in France, but in the 13 years there I never once got a photo of one. When we returned to NI and I bought my camera my one regret was that I'd never get a photo of a hoopoe. Never say never, I guess!
I used to see them too in France too as a kid, they could be found in the campsites (west coast)
 

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