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How to catch a King Cobra (1 Viewer)

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Clearly a trusted method with the hand on the head, I've seen this before, a bit like Sharks going docile if rolled over but I wouldn't want to try that either 🦈🦈🦈🦈

In many places, this would go in the pot or would just be pointlessly killed but, as they specialise in eating other snakes, I wonder if they're more tolerated than other species when found around villages?
 
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Essex Tern

🦆🥋🏃🏻‍♂️📷🎹🎸
Supporter
Europe
My favoured method would be having someone like him on speed dial! That’s one of those things where you might know the principles, but are still too 🐓 (or maybe sensible) to even think about attempting, makes me glad we only have Adders here!
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
My favoured method would be having someone like him on speed dial! That’s one of those things where you might know the principles, but are still too 🐓 (or maybe sensible) to even think about attempting, makes me glad we only have Adders here!
An Adder bite is bad enough, believe me!
 

Sterngucker

RⒶdneck
In my family lore has it that my grandfather, while living and working in Rio Grande do Sul/Brazil in the '20s and '30s of last century was rather adept at chopping cobras' heads off with his machete. (Maybe that's why I am so good with western diamondbacks LOL)
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
In my family lore has it that my grandfather, while living and working in Rio Grande do Sul/Brazil in the '20s and '30s of last century was rather adept at chopping cobras' heads off with his machete. (Maybe that's why I am so good with western diamondbacks LOL)
I think that the "true" cobras (Naja) are found in Africa and Asia. I'm very impressed with the guy's skill in charming and subduing the snake - a soldier's test of bravery and survival skills..... though probably destined for the pot, as Andy suggested, rather than just despatched. I guess it is second nature if you are raised and living amongst dangerous animals.
 
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nartreb

Speak softly and carry a long lens
I think that the "true" cobras (Naja) are found in Africa and Asia. I'm very impressed with the guy's skill in charming and subduing the snake - a soldier's test of bravery and survival skills..... though probably destined for the pot, as Andy suggested, rather than just despatched. I guess it is second nature if you are raised and living amongst dangerous animals.
Correct. Brazil does have some elapids, but those are coral snakes, and most are small. On the other hand, Brazilian vipers are large and memorable. (I think the famous fer-de-lance doesn't reach as far south as Rio Grande do Sul, but I bet some of its relatives do.) I wouldn't want to get within machete range of one: like their relatives the rattlesnake, they coil in a way that makes it difficult to judge their striking range, compared to a cobra. I guess it's all a question of what you're prepared for.
 

Sterngucker

RⒶdneck
With rattlers it is usually safe to assume that they can strike up and along about a third of their body length. At an average length of ca. 5' (152 cm) that gives it a striking range of ca. 1/2 m or about 2'. So you need to stay at least three feet away and have some good snake boots or other protection going up to your knees. I use snake-proof gaiters which cover the tops of my footwear so fangs cannot become entangled in bootlaces leading to a dangerous mess. My snake tongs have not seen action yet and my 'snakecharming stick' (a honed edger) is about 5' long. And my machete is just a machete. I have a whole tupperware box full of rattles.
And before people accuse me of animal cruelty or whatever: I used to have a severe snake phobia which I had to overcome after a young rattler struck out from underneath a rock killing my dog. My wife had been planting tomatoes nearby.
Shrinks would call it confrontation therapy. Snakes out in the wild are in their element and I am a visitor and behave accordingly. Venomous snakes near the house are on my patch and a dangerous liability - get it now or in half an hour you will not know where it lurks.
 

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