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How to lure raptors to the ground (1 Viewer)

Apodemus

Well-known member
Isn't there a bit of over-reaction going on here? I think that the question of whether or not it is "fair" to attract raptors with roadkill is probably a reasonable one to debate but how does anyone think that such a question could benefit the bad guys? It's hard to imagine a dodgy gamekeeper sitting at home thinking "I wish, I wish, there was a way of attracting buzzards within reach of my gun", then doing a google search and leaping off the settee shouting "Roadkill - luring!!! Why didn't I think of that??"
 

shark attack

Well-known member
I know farmers that complain because there are 'too many Buzzards now'. They may be called 'Common' Buzzards but in living memory, they were extinct in most Counties in England.

As to Red Kites being 'poor hunters', well ...

Just have a think, look again at the Thread title and consider that this is all being posted on an open forum.

How many selfish humans do you know?

As to red kites being poor hunters....................well..................well what ?? its common knowledge that red Kites are not the best Hunting BOP.

I could be wrong but why do we have lots of feeding stations for these birds ?? and why do they in lots of cases come down for food that people have left out for them. if you care to go on youtube you can watch these magnificent birds coming down into people's back gardens to take food.
What is the harm i this ?? we are doing them a favour and helping them survive......to many people on here once again have their heads up their own A***s................Look the facts are lots of people feed these birds no harm done.....yet once again we have the doogooders coming on a saying its wrong.

Well its not wrong its OK to do this.....and if someone wants to do the same thing in the middle of a farmers field let them get on with it...if people want to do it in their own backyard what is the difference....the birds are none of the wiser.

one of the best known naturalists this country has ever produced used to drag dead deer up the hill out the back where he lived for GE to feed on and mentioned this in his books........would any of you dare to tell this person his actions were wrong...NO OF COURSE NOT BECAUSE NONE OF YOU WOULD HAVE HAD THE BALLS TO.

How could any of you on here tell someone that they are wrong from behind your office desk............when they are living out in the wild and up close to the very species you claim you are trying to protect....................breeding season my arse..thats all you go on about....go and iron your shirts and your action slacks and come back when you have learnt a bit about real wildlife !!!
 

Mike Price

Well-known member
As to red kites being poor hunters....................well..................well what ?? its common knowledge that red Kites are not the best Hunting BOP.

I could be wrong but why do we have lots of feeding stations for these birds ?? and why do they in lots of cases come down for food that people have left out for them. if you care to go on youtube you can watch these magnificent birds coming down into people's back gardens to take food.
What is the harm i this ?? we are doing them a favour and helping them survive......to many people on here once again have their heads up their own A***s................Look the facts are lots of people feed these birds no harm done.....yet once again we have the doogooders coming on a saying its wrong.

Well its not wrong its OK to do this.....and if someone wants to do the same thing in the middle of a farmers field let them get on with it...if people want to do it in their own backyard what is the difference....the birds are none of the wiser.

one of the best known naturalists this country has ever produced used to drag dead deer up the hill out the back where he lived for GE to feed on and mentioned this in his books........would any of you dare to tell this person his actions were wrong...NO OF COURSE NOT BECAUSE NONE OF YOU WOULD HAVE HAD THE BALLS TO.

How could any of you on here tell someone that they are wrong from behind your office desk............when they are living out in the wild and up close to the very species you claim you are trying to protect....................breeding season my arse..thats all you go on about....go and iron your shirts and your action slacks and come back when you have learnt a bit about real wildlife !!!

Sorry to disagree but if you pulled your own head out of your arse you would of read that I didn't think a public forum is a place to discuss the best way to lure raptors, I don't care how many ways they already know, do we really want to provide any further ideas or help?

Taking pictures is a very enjoyable hobby, one I take part in myself but it comes second to my other interest which is raptor protection and doesn't involve being behind a desk or wearing an ironed shirt but 100's of hours monitoring and witnessing many instances of illegal persecution.

Buzzards may be common where you are, doesn't mean they are everywhere, sure we see them when the breeding season starts but strangely they never seem to make it to the point where the young would have fledged.

http://birdingfrontiers.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/peak_nestwatch_2010.pdf
 
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shark attack

Well-known member
Isn't there a bit of over-reaction going on here? I think that the question of whether or not it is "fair" to attract raptors with roadkill is probably a reasonable one to debate but how does anyone think that such a question could benefit the bad guys? It's hard to imagine a dodgy gamekeeper sitting at home thinking "I wish, I wish, there was a way of attracting buzzards within reach of my gun", then doing a google search and leaping off the settee shouting "Roadkill - luring!!! Why didn't I think of that??"

Glad someone on here has a bit of common sense about them.....how this thread turned its ugly head around from someone asking how to get a photo of a common buzzard to the welfare of BOP is beyound me................
 

Stephen Fletcher

Yes, i did take the photo of the Eagle
It is actually against the law to lure birds of prey. Firsty due to the diturbance caused, and secondly, it is also illegal to put down meat, especially rooadkill, as it will have been transported from another area, with risk of disease transfer from one site to another.

Film makers do this, as they have a licence to do so, all the necessary permissions, and strict safety regulations that they have to adhere to.

Reading up on the law before posting such a thread as this would surely have been far more sensible.
 

Adam W

Well-known member
Isn't there a bit of over-reaction going on here? I think that the question of whether or not it is "fair" to attract raptors with roadkill is probably a reasonable one to debate but how does anyone think that such a question could benefit the bad guys? It's hard to imagine a dodgy gamekeeper sitting at home thinking "I wish, I wish, there was a way of attracting buzzards within reach of my gun", then doing a google search and leaping off the settee shouting "Roadkill - luring!!! Why didn't I think of that??"

Exactly couldnt have put it better.
 

mrsroadrunner

mrsroadrunner.com
Well.... I have a pretty good collection of my own photographs of birds of prey and I do not know how anyone can wait around for anything!!
I have several "tricks" I use. One is the ravens. The ravens will "tell" on any bird of prey who is even looking like they are going to take their meal away! These ravens are very loud and they fly high enough one can see them from a distance, heck one can hear them!!
Get your equipment and start out. Hiking to where ever the action is. This is one of my methods and it has been very successful for me.
We are a farming community, so any fields that are being plowed is a oasis for birds of prey. Young hawks, they may fly on you... but not far! Young birds in general really do not know they are supposed to be afraid of us.
As you pointed out, birds of prey are also scavengers. Again, I do not know how anyone can sit around and wait for anything when the action might be going on over there..... keep practicing and do your own thing. Advice is great, but I am sure everyone will agree we all have our own way of doing things.....
Wish you well!!
 

willito

Guillermo Cartagena
... which is raptor protection and doesn't involve being behind a desk or wearing an ironed shirt but 100's of hours monitoring and witnessing many instances of illegal persecution.

:clap:

Sorry if this does not refer to the former thread subject, but I really think these actions have to be praised.
 

Sydsmythe

Well-known member
I had a fortunate experience with some Black Vultures the other day. We are loaded with Black and Turkey vultures here in South Florida.
A group of BVs were feeding in the middle of a dirt road near a wildlife refuge. Unfortunately this road is adjacent to a few horse stables, and while I know there are wonderful nature-minding horse folks in the world, the group in this area tends to care only about their expensive polo ponies and dressage horses. They come flying down the dirt road , frequently leaving behind roadkill, including vultures. Thes vultures had to scatter quickly to avoid becoming such.
I stopped my car and picked up the dead possum on which they were feeding to move it off the road. Two of them followed me very closely, within a foot or two. They grunted at me but at least they didn't vomit ;) I stood within a yard , watching the five of them eat their meal. Too bad I just had my pocket camera. And I'm sure the speeding horse folk thought I was nuts.

And I've often wondered if playing dead would work. I look forward to hanging out with some more vultures sometime.
 

jlees1996

jlees1996
Im sorry, i meant know disrespect to anyone or any harm to any birds.
All I want is some nice photos to add to my growing portfolio, most garden birds are relatively easy to get close to with my currently 'rubbish' camera. But Buzzards are a completely different kettle of fish and so I say thanks to those who gave me what I wanted, some simple, basic, non-violent advice.

I would also like to say that where I live (Northern Ireland) there is very little raptor persecution, we welcome the birds here the clean up exploding rabbit and mice populations which eat our crops, the only birds shot locally are crows, apart from this you will see one poisoning or shooting of a Raptor each year (thats in a considerabley large population).
 

shark attack

Well-known member
It is actually against the law to lure birds of prey. Firsty due to the diturbance caused, and secondly, it is also illegal to put down meat, especially rooadkill, as it will have been transported from another area, with risk of disease transfer from one site to another.

Film makers do this, as they have a licence to do so, all the necessary permissions, and strict safety regulations that they have to adhere to.

Reading up on the law before posting such a thread as this would surely have been far more sensible.

Who mentioned anything about roadkill ??

Secondly it is not against the law to photograph Common Buzzards...they are not on the protected list..you have the right to try and get photo of a Common Buzzard in exactly the same way you would have the rite to photograph a blackbird or blue tit.

Show me a scrap of evidence which suggets that this activity would be illegall. I might save you the trouble at trawking through the CRWA and the WCA because these acts only refer to birds in the schedule 1 species.

And the act states that you have to be intentionally or recklessly disturbing th birds.

I hardly think Jlees request would have been any of the above !!!!!!!!!!!!
 

MJB

Well-known member
Who mentioned anything about roadkill ?? Secondly it is not against the law to photograph Common Buzzards...they are not on the protected list..you have the right to try and get photo of a Common Buzzard in exactly the same way you would have the rite to photograph a blackbird or blue tit. Show me a scrap of evidence which suggets that this activity would be illegall. I might save you the trouble at trawking through the CRWA and the WCA because these acts only refer to birds in the schedule 1 species. And the act states that you have to be intentionally or recklessly disturbing th birds. I hardly think Jlees request would have been any of the above !!!!!!!!!!!!

Stephen's point was made clearly and you have either avoided it or not taken time to understand it. The road-kill reference was merely an additional aspect, not the main subject. I've enjoyed many of your previous posts, and largely agreed with them, but here perhaps you were just a little too quick to respond - luring birds to be photographed is not the same as photographing birds just when the opportunity presents itself. In the former, the risk of disturbance does seem much higher than in the latter.

However, context matters, as is spelled out in the licensing aspect previously mentioned - case law I would surmise will be based on the interpretation of how licensing is applied within the context of appropriate Acts of Parliament, and not limited to CRWA and WCA. I'm sure we must have several people in the legal profession as Bird Forum members who could expound on these aspects with far greater authority than I could!
MJB
PS Twelve exclamation marks might be consdered a trifle excessive...
 

Irish Kite

Well-known member
I would also like to say that where I live (Northern Ireland) there is very little raptor persecution, .

I'd be carefull with statements like that - many of the released Goldies from Donegal have "disappeared" over NI with Antrim in particular a blackspot. And not all dead Red Kites found in NI have died of "hunger" eitheir!!:-C
 

shark attack

Well-known member
What a way to go ;)

The vultures here are protected species, but you'd never know it from the way people disrespect them.

The original question posed on here about how to lure a Common buzzard dwon for a photo is what we are ment to be debating..if we cant debate it on an open Birdforum then maybe we should be discussing this question via private e mail.

Whilst the answers given to jlees might not be in everyones favour the facts are that he was posing a question which could actually be answered. Whether it is everone's cup of tea or not is totally irrelevant.

I have explained that he could do something to help him get this photo within the law...and that is the fact..just because a lot of people on here do not agree with these methods does not mean we are not allowed to disscuss them.

We are not talking about Jlees putting out some bait i the middle of a field everyday and sitting there in his hide all day waiting to get the shot.

Like someone has mentioned if he ants to sit in a hide at he side of a forest and put something out to attract the buzzard 30 yds away out in the open for his photo then so be it.

By merely discussing this is not going to help any one at all and there horrible methods poisn a BOP. Like I have said these low lifes who do poison BOP have been doing all there lives with their traps and their poisons and as mentioned before actually getting away with it. I think this thread would actually help less poisoninngs ( if thats how you spell it ). Scenario would Jlees whilst sitting in the forest waiting to get his photo, report someone laying down bait nearby for no apparant reason.

I am sure Jlees would report this to the authorities and might even get a prosecution...had he not been therewe ould have another poisoned bird but no one there to witness it.

Just because we are there but not protectonists does not mean to say we would not report something untoward...the more people out there like us can only be a good thing the more theeyes the better.......but as usual the protectionist would rather have only there own eyes to protect than anyone elses.

The police support neighbourhood watch schemes and rely on membersof the public to catch people in he middle of thier crimes...pity the people in the birding fraternity didnt think like this..we might have a lot of wildlife crime reported and mors prsosecutions of peole who actually poison BOP.

Remember 4 pairs of eyes are better than two or even none in these areas where wildlife crimes are committed..its just a pity the very people protecting these birds do not think this way...FACT ! One excalamation mark.
 
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