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Hundreds of Blue Jays in our backyard (1 Viewer)

Chanterelle

New member
Canada
Something very surprising happened yesterday afternoon. I heard birds singing very loudly in our back yard. It kept getting louder and louder and I thought at first it was black birds (sounded very similar).
My yard is surrounded by hedges and there is a large tree in the back so we do get a fair amount of different birds but this was something else. It was so loud that I could hear it inside my house with the windows closed and I was getting a bit freaked out (it was extremely loud). When we went to investigate, we found there were hundreds of Blue Jays in the trees and the hedges. It was fascinating to witness but left me quite baffled.
Anybody encounter anything like this before. I am in Eastern Ontario, Canada and we have very cold weather this time of year so not sure if they migrate or not. I did see online that there was a phenomenon about migrating Blue Jays but just baffled why they would stop here. We recorded the sound because it was so unusual and very, very loud.
I find Blue Jays fascinating. A few years back, we had a bird cam and recorded a very strange bald bird eating at one of our feeders which turned out to be a Blue Jay. We had to look it up online because we had no idea what this odd looking bald bird was but turns out it was a Blue Jay. From what I could find online, apparently they shed their feathers at that particular time of the year.
 
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Kits

Picture Picker
Welcome to Birdforum. I hope you enjoy your visits.

What an amazing experience for you.
 

Deans Sanctuary

Well-known member
United States
Interesting that the numbers were in the hundreds...because some Blue Jays migrate and others don't I doubt it was due to a migration but simply large numbers that had formed up as a result of a large food source was available at 1 location and it being January when natural feeding habits are not available as in insects etc. that lends it then to a source like a grainery or a like source that would pull in those types of numbers. Enjoy it for what it is and put out some peanuts in shells, Blue Jays are great to have around.
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Lots of corvid species join together to roost overnight. Safety in numbers, a safe roosting area, and exchanging of information on feeding areas. Don't know about Blue Jays specifically.

Pre-roosts also, and typically noisy.
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Very interesting! They can break the bank going through any food you leave out for them

Hi there and a warm welcome to you from those of us on staff here at BirdForum (y)
We're glad you found us and please join in wherever you like. ;)
 

Deans Sanctuary

Well-known member
United States
Lots of corvid species join together to roost overnight. Safety in numbers, a safe roosting area, and exchanging of information on feeding areas. Don't know about Blue Jays specifically.

Pre-roosts also, and typically noisy.
True enough but middle of the winter in SE Ontario Canada the steam that pushes the boat is available food sources.
 

Chanterelle

New member
Canada
Interesting that the numbers were in the hundreds...because some Blue Jays migrate and others don't I doubt it was due to a migration but simply large numbers that had formed up as a result of a large food source was available at 1 location and it being January when natural feeding habits are not available as in insects etc. that lends it then to a source like a grainery or a like source that would pull in those types of numbers. Enjoy it for what it is and put out some peanuts in shells, Blue Jays are great to have around.
Yes, we were quite surprised to see hundreds of them in our yard. We do have bird feeders so perhaps being winter and them being hungry, they might have gathered at this particular location. It was just very odd to watch yet fascinating.
We used to put out peanuts as well but it was mostly for the squirrels yet we found that the blue jays would also eat them but it also left a mess and I think might have attracted raccoons which are plentiful where we are located.
My husband does have a recording of the experience on his phone and when I listen to it, I feel like we witnessed something rather special.
Blue Jays are so beautiful and lovely to look at. We also have other species in our backyard such as cardinals (simply gorgeous), robins (lovely) and plenty of yellow finches (I think they are called American Goldfinches).
We have indoor cats that love to watch them as well (they are strictly indoor cats) but I am not too thrilled to have neighbourhood cats in my yard as one of them especially enjoys eating birds.
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Like I mentioned earlier the Blue Jays can eat you out of house and home so stock up girl :)
 

Deans Sanctuary

Well-known member
United States
Yes, we were quite surprised to see hundreds of them in our yard. We do have bird feeders so perhaps being winter and them being hungry, they might have gathered at this particular location. It was just very odd to watch yet fascinating.
We used to put out peanuts as well but it was mostly for the squirrels yet we found that the blue jays would also eat them but it also left a mess and I think might have attracted raccoons which are plentiful where we are located.
My husband does have a recording of the experience on his phone and when I listen to it, I feel like we witnessed something rather special.
Blue Jays are so beautiful and lovely to look at. We also have other species in our backyard such as cardinals (simply gorgeous), robins (lovely) and plenty of yellow finches (I think they are called American Goldfinches).
We have indoor cats that love to watch them as well (they are strictly indoor cats) but I am not too thrilled to have neighbourhood cats in my yard as one of them especially enjoys eating birds.
You can also take a lesson from the Canada Goose who in late fall through the winter raft up on one of the Finger Lakes in upstate New York. They spend all day all night on the water with 2 exceptions. Just before dawn they leave for the farms where fields of harvested corn once stood to feed and again just before nightfall will hit the very same field for the same reason. This day after day through the winter and in numbers up to and into the hundreds. No I'm not implying Blue Jays raft up on the water only justifying what you witnessed.
 

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