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I like Watches (1 Viewer)

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
I couldn't sell anyhing that was a gift much less a gift from my parents!

Well, I still have the Rolex Oyster I received from my parents in 1966. It's in semi-retirement now as Rolex don't supply spares for the 1210 calibre and while not my favourite watch, it's the last one I would ever sell.

I recall travelling to Bond Street in London to make my decision and a salesman at Watches of Switzerland telling me that IWC was better than Rolex (which it probably was then) and that at Asprey's the "cheapest" Patek Philippe was 150 GBP, exactly four times as much as the Rolex. As the second cheapest was 250 GBP, I suspect the first one must have been stainless steel, a rarity for Patek then and worth a fortune today, certainly more than the same watch in precious metal. I fulfilled the dream of a Patek over ten years ago before the prices went exospheric.

Just to throw some controversy into the conversation, I don't like quartz, which has no soul and neither like nor can afford complications. I can admire the ingenuity of a minute repeater or a perpetual calendar, but a wristwatch really only needs three hands. Winding a fine watch can be an aesthetic experience, but, unfortunately handwound watches are becoming a rarity. An automatic is fully wound after two or three hours of wearing but after that you are just feeding it with unnecessary energy, which is dissipated in friction and wear.

John

PS:- John, You don't happen to have a handwound Vacheron & Constantin among those? ;) I passed on one from the 50s a few years ago for comparatively cheap €2500 and regret that today.
 
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Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
...Just to throw some controversy into the conversation, I don't like quartz, which has no soul and neither like nor can afford complications. I can admire the ingenuity of a minute repeater or a perpetual calendar, but a wristwatch really only needs three hands. Winding a fine watch can be an aesthetic experience, but, unfortunately handwound watches are becoming a rarity. An automatic is fully wound after two or three hours of wearing but after that you are just feeding it with unnecessary energy, which is dissipated in friction and wear...

Agreed to all that except that I appreciate quartz for certain watches and purposes (e.g. Hamilton Khaki Quartz models are very nice thin reliable field watches) and I prefer a date with those 3 hands (preferably at 6 o'clock position). I consider it very unfortunate that handwinding is so rare these days. I find it more convenient than automatic, especially if I am rotating between watches, because with a tiny bit of attention once a day, it is easy to keep several watches properly wound and ready for use (without need for winders). Some autos shouldn't be hand-wound, making it tricky to be confident that they are getting reasonably well wound while in rotation, even if they have big power reserves. Also, handwinders can easily be made thin, and so fit under clothing layers better, which is good for field use in winter!

--AP
 

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
Agreed to all that except that I appreciate quartz for certain watches and purposes (e.g. Hamilton Khaki Quartz models are very nice thin reliable field watches) and I prefer a date with those 3 hands (preferably at 6 o'clock position). I consider it very unfortunate that handwinding is so rare these days. I find it more convenient than automatic, especially if I am rotating between watches, because with a tiny bit of attention once a day, it is easy to keep several watches properly wound and ready for use (without need for winders). Some autos shouldn't be hand-wound, making it tricky to be confident that they are getting reasonably well wound while in rotation, even if they have big power reserves. Also, handwinders can easily be made thin, and so fit under clothing layers better, which is good for field use in winter!

--AP

Alexis,

A three-hand watch only takes a few seconds to set, so I wouldn't want to accelerate wear by keeping anything running except my daily beater, a Nomos Club. I recall an ex-colleague had an Omega chronograph with full calendar and moonphase, which he only wore occasionally. He said it always took him about 10 mins to set. Conversely, another friend has a Patek Gondolo 8 Days and an Annual Calendar and only bothers to set the time!
I believe some of the older Seiko automatics couldn't be hand wound but the only one I've heard of where it was inadvisable is the Lemania 8810 (aka Longines 990).

John
 

Torview

Well-known member
Alexis,

A three-hand watch only takes a few seconds to set, so I wouldn't want to accelerate wear by keeping anything running except my daily beater, a Nomos Club. I recall an ex-colleague had an Omega chronograph with full calendar and moonphase, which he only wore occasionally. He said it always took him about 10 mins to set. Conversely, another friend has a Patek Gondolo 8 Days and an Annual Calendar and only bothers to set the time!
I believe some of the older Seiko automatics couldn't be hand wound but the only one I've heard of where it was inadvisable is the Lemania 8810 (aka Longines 990).

John

Hi John,

A Nomos is on my radar, they seem great value given the daft prices some brands are commanding these days.

A few years ago I would have agreed with you about quartz but getting the Omega has totally changed my mind.

I had the auto version as well which wore the same but preferred the quartz, also the cost of servicing is getting silly these days IMHO, 30-40 years ago I used to get my Bulova serviced every two years by a local watch maker who would strip the movement, clean and lubricate it for £10, still have it by the way but can`t find anywhere to service it in the same simple way, they all quote £3-400, mad.
 

albie...

Well-known member
I decided against getting the Timex automatic I mentioned earlier and bought another Seiko automatic field watch . This new Seiko can be hand wound and the second hand can be hacked . It has a domed crystal , I think they call it single dome . It also came with a nato strap that I replaced with a single pass nato . Couldn't stand the bundle of strap on the side of the watch from the original strap . The accuracy of this watch is way better than what's advertised , losing roughly 3-5 seconds a day .
A few pics. One is from an ad .
 

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albie...

Well-known member
I was thinking of adding a solar watch to my collection and came across this one, a Junghans Force Mega Solar . It is radio controlled , has a ceramic case/strap , saphire crystal and has digital display for date function. A little bit pricey for me at close to $2000CA but I sure do like it .Perhaps I will save up for it , maybe .


 

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albie...

Well-known member
Here is a lovely Hamilton remake of a watch from the 70's . I love the hybrid display . Would like to add that to my stable .
 

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