• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Identification Help Needed for Pale Duck in Michigan, USA (1 Viewer)

zerb21

Bruce Moorman
I saw this unknown pale duck in North Hydro Park that's located in southeast Michigan, USA on February 10, 2022. It was swimming in the Huron River with other ducks that included Mallards, American Black Ducks, Redheads, Ring-necked Ducks, Common Goldeneyes, Common Mergansers, Hooded Mergansers, and a female Northern Pintail. It looked just a bit smaller than the Mallards that were near it. Thank you for any help identifying it.
 

Attachments

  • 2022_02_10_NHydro_9597.jpeg
    2022_02_10_NHydro_9597.jpeg
    168.5 KB · Views: 23
  • 2022_02_10_NHydro_9573.jpeg
    2022_02_10_NHydro_9573.jpeg
    171.2 KB · Views: 23

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Hello Bruce,
still looks like an abearrantly coloured Mallard to me. They come in a large variety of colours and patterns.
You can find many examples here on birdforum.
 

nartreb

Speak softly and carry a long lens
Yup, female mallard with much paler plumage than wild-type, almost certainly due to domestic ancestry. (Pale, leucistic, and albino birds do occur in the wild, but I reckon this bird isn't one of those. I'm pretty sure that to get mostly white plumage but a relatively dark head and breast, and some color in the wings, you've got to have lots of genetic changes from wild-type, which suggests sustained domestic breeding.)
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Yup, female mallard with much paler plumage than wild-type, almost certainly due to domestic ancestry. (Pale, leucistic, and albino birds do occur in the wild, but I reckon this bird isn't one of those. I'm pretty sure that to get mostly white plumage but a relatively dark head and breast, and some color in the wings, you've got to have lots of genetic changes from wild-type, which suggests sustained domestic breeding.)
I agree.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top