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Identity of bird in painting (1 Viewer)

nartreb

Speak softly and carry a long lens
This nicely illustrates the difficulty of relying on photographs taken in dim light or at surprising angles, especially when the date and location are not given.

It is not a bird at all. Nor is it a plane. It is Superman, and his sidekick Supergirl, diving into a duckweed-covered pond. Supergirl has narrowly missed a large boulder at one end of the pond. Also visible are a haystack and a couple of fallen trees.

And two swans resting on the boulder. Either trumpeter or Tundra, can't be certain, but obviously not Mute.
 

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Hello Mono,
I agree with Tom, what a nice gift.

Yes, I agree with all, that the choosen colours represents rather the available colours and a successful attempt to bring in contrast in this bird.
Is it possible to place a "thumbs up"- button on this picture?

And: an interesting idea, to test the Merlin-App with this picture. Maybe the Cornell-Lab can benefit from this idea? Yes, thats a serious question. Why has the app identified it as a Sooty Tern?

And: thank you Mono for sharing the picture and this unconvential idea with us! Together with all the answers and Toms description of a species new to science. Such a nice and pleasant change. Thanks again for sharing!
 

rkj

Well-known member
Clearly this is a male Summer Tanager in its first Spring that has molted its wing feathers to their adult red while still retaining its body feathers in their juvenile green. Some leucism is affecting the head. An early Audubon perhaps, rather than a Thorburn. The National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. might be interested.
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
Clearly this is a male Summer Tanager in its first Spring that has molted its wing feathers to their adult red while still retaining its body feathers in their juvenile green. Some leucism is affecting the head. An early Audubon perhaps, rather than a Thorburn. The National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C. might be interested.
Summer Tanager would explain the large, pale bill!
 

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