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IDs for Southwestern Texas? (1 Viewer)

Tired

Well-known member
United States
These are all from a scrubby area on an exotic game ranch- antelope and the like. Uvalde County, which is one county over from Mexico. Lots of bird activity! I got a good thirty-seven species. I have a few I need additional opinions on.

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1: Female or juvenile Vermillion Flycatcher, maybe?

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2: Any pointers on which Myiarchus flycatcher?

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3: This one, I don't know. I thought sparrow at first, but it looks odd to me. Any thoughts?
 

Butty

Well-known member
2. From distribution and tail-pattern, I guess great crested flycatcher or (less likely for both those reasons) brown-crested flycatcher.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
For the second, I'd go with brown-crested: all dark bill, somewhat dull tail pattern, contrast of tertial white edges not very strong
 

peterginsburg

Well-known member
It would be nice to have a voice recording but lacking that, how is Ash-throated eliminated? The brown of the outer rectrix vane appears to cross inward over the rachis. It's not a good angle but the bill does not seem very chunky. Not a determining factor but I believe given the location that Ash-throat would be the commoner species.
 

Butty

Well-known member
Sibley shows, and describes, the darker brown on the tip of the tail of ash-throated flycatcher extending across the whole width of the tail. On the OP's bird it does not do this - rather, it fits Sibley's illustration of great crested flycatcher or brown-crested flycatcher, in which the dark brown is only on the sides of the tail-tip.
 

peterginsburg

Well-known member
Unfortunately field guides cannot show all plumage variations. Sibley's note in his FG states "usually extends across tip." Dittmann and Cardiff's seminal article on Myiarchus identification for the Louisiana Ornithological society points out variation in the rectrices of Ash-throated flycatcher.
 

Tired

Well-known member
United States
It's a wonder anyone ever figured out how many Myiarchus species there are in the first place. I can't remember any details of the call on this one, I was distracted by vireo sounds and trying to locate everything I could hear in the area. I didn't see the front of it well enough to say anything about colors there.

That sparrow is still throwing me. I think it's the angle of the head, not showing many markings. It looks odd, almost like its head is nearly entirely pale, when sparrows usually seem to have pretty heavily marked faces and heads. But I'll definitely take Chipping Sparrow as an ID- I've found some pictures that are pretty close, and there were plenty of Chippings in the area.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Unfortunately field guides cannot show all plumage variations. Sibley's note in his FG states "usually extends across tip." Dittmann and Cardiff's seminal article on Myiarchus identification for the Louisiana Ornithological society points out variation in the rectrices of Ash-throated flycatcher.
Thanks for pointing that article out:

Louisiana Ornithological Society

Looking again and reading this I now agree this must be ash-throated. The outer tail feather's pattern looks like the right hand example here:

Myiarchus Figure 7 by Donna L. Dittmann - LOS News - December 2000
 
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