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Indian Silverbill in Dubai this very morning? (1 Viewer)

Aladdin

Well-known member
Thailand
dear members and bird watchers

Picture #1 is an Indian silverbill I saw this morning in a group of about 10 birds eating seeds at the Al Mamzar Beach Park.

And they behave as other sparrows and munias. I try to get close for a picture and the group takes off to start feed on another grass spot.

Something looks strange and I discover a yellowish bird in the group. Flying and feeding with the Indian silverbill.

I think it is an Arabian Golden Sparrow, but when I´m back at my hotel I consult my new book "Birds in the Middle East" I see that the Arabian Golden Sparrow. And the Arabian Golden Sparrow have patterns on their back, even the juvenile.

My bird have an even copper/ brownish colour of the back without any patterns

Any members that know the identity of the bird?

Kind regards
Aladdin
 

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#2 also looks like an indian silverbill to me although the auricular region looks too dark for one.

Thank you satyachil

Yes, the colour looks very different. Maybe some albino effect or something

Kind regards and happy birding
Aladdin
 
Agree with Indian Silverbill for #2. Tail too dark, elongated and pointed for Scaly-breasted Munia (compare here, even if the species is subject to some subspecific variation); outer wing (primaries, outer wing coverts on the "shoulder") also too dark for that species, bill shape not consistent with it and colour not right as well (a juv. would have a black bill, not 2-toned). In fact the only thing that would seem not typical of Indian Silverbill would be the slightly buffier cheeks, which could be age-related (juveniles certainly don't have the paler cheeks). Tail shape and colour is typical for Indian Silverbill as are other aspects (including structure related ones) of this bird.
Here's 2 examples of buffier ones: 1 and 2
 
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Agree with Indian Silverbill for #2. Tail too dark, elongated and pointed for Scaly-breasted Munia (compare here, even if the species is subject to some subspecific variation); outer wing (primaries, outer wing coverts on the "shoulder") also too dark for that species, bill shape not consistent with it and colour not right as well (a juv. would have a black bill, not 2-toned). In fact the only thing that would seem not typical of Indian Silverbill would be the slightly buffier cheeks, which could be age-related (juveniles certainly don't have the paler cheeks). Tail shape and colour is typical for Indian Silverbill as are other aspects (including structure related ones) of this bird.
Here's an example of a buffier one: https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/photo/indian-silverbill-munia-royalty-free-image/464858259


Thank you

I clicked the link and I just came to some shopping site: https://www.viglink.com/shop/merchants

Kind regards and happy birding
Aladdin
 
Agree with Indian Silverbill for #2. Tail too dark, elongated and pointed for Scaly-breasted Munia (compare here, even if the species is subject to some subspecific variation); outer wing (primaries, outer wing coverts on the "shoulder") also too dark for that species, bill shape not consistent with it and colour not right as well (a juv. would have a black bill, not 2-toned). In fact the only thing that would seem not typical of Indian Silverbill would be the slightly buffier cheeks, which could be age-related (juveniles certainly don't have the paler cheeks). Tail shape and colour is typical for Indian Silverbill as are other aspects (including structure related ones) of this bird.
Here's 2 examples of buffier ones: 1 and 2

In addition to this, it doesn't have the weird fleshy bit on the gapeline of Scaly-breasted (I'm not sure how to describe this feature, but you could see it on the Pune bird posted yesterday).
 
In addition to this, it doesn't have the weird fleshy bit on the gapeline of Scaly-breasted (I'm not sure how to describe this feature, but you could see it on the Pune bird posted yesterday).

Agreed Andy, but juvenile (better said young juvs.) Indian Silverbill also have them, it's just an age related feature (the gape flanges "shrink" as the juvenile ages, at the same time as bill changes colour to adult type).
 
Dear all

Just received an e-mail from http://www.uaebirding.com/ and some information about the Indian Silverbill. This was my Guide here in UAE and he works for WHO and conservation here in UAE.

I qoute:

It’s quite usual to find indian silverbill of different colors. Actually they are caught by some people (Indians or Pakistani), who catch them, paint them and release them. I do not really know why they are doing that, but I have seen some in different occasions of different colors (pink, green, red…) in different places, where there are labours working in the fields or parks….

Kind regards and happy birding
Aladdin
 
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