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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

IOC World Bird List V2.0 (1 Viewer)

Yes, we're close but have some technical glitches to work out for this major update. Give us a couple of days and I'll post a note when it's ready. BTW, this is an exciting update!

Sally
 
errr...is one of the glitches the duplication of Tyrannidae and the subsequent absence of New Zealand Wrens, Broadbills, and Pittas?

Good work by the way!
 
Yes, we're close but have some technical glitches to work out for this major update. Give us a couple of days and I'll post a note when it's ready. BTW, this is an exciting update!
Sally
Sally, sorry I jumped the gun! A quick look reveals that the updates do indeed look very interesting.

When Birds of the World - Recommended English Names was first published in 2006, the focus was firmly on vernacular names and it was made clear that it was not primarily a taxonomic work.

But with the subsequent updates, the list has rapidly evolved to the point where, in my opinion, it has now taken a clear lead amongst the regularly updated online world lists, on matters of taxonomy as well as vernacular names. The latest updates in particular demonstrate a very active review of recent taxonomic developments. And the approach taken to proposed splits for potential later acceptance is very useful.

Your work is greatly appreciated.

Richard
 
Update Complete

The IOC World Bird Names Website http://www.worldbirdnames.org/ has been updated. List 2.0 contains 10,331 species classified in 42 Orders, 226 Families and 2199 Genera. This is a major update that includes revisions of the family classification as well as species taxonomy. It is the first step in aligning the world list with advances in understanding the evolutionary relationships of birds based on the recent surge of DNA studies. Among other changes, the list now includes more than 200 recently split and newly described species, revisions of the Old World Warbler Families, and a resequencing of suboscine families to align with South American Checklist Committee classification. We invite you to explore the list, hope you find it useful and welcome your feedback.

Sally Conyne & Frank Gill
 
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