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Irresponsible gardeners (1 Viewer)

Paul Longland

Well-known member
I am currently sitting looking at a deserted feeding station in my back garden as a result of my neighbours actions.

I only have a small patch of suburban garden. I live on a corner so the house to my side and rear have the large gardens and mine is the square patch between. I have a good mix of evergreen and deciduous shrubs, perennial/annual borders and a small patio area with a 4' square raised pond. I do not have the space to grow any trees. However, as the neighbouring gardens are all much larger than mine I was surrounded by many mature trees and large shrubs etc.

However, the tale of woe started at the beginning of this year when one of my neighbours cut down the large London plane tree that overhung my garden. He did this because, without asking, he believed that I thought it was a nuisance after I cut off a branch that was looking a bit dodgy following a storm. This tree overhung my pond, providing shade for the fish and which helped to keep the algae down. It was also perfect cover for birds to nip in and out to my feeders which were close by, especially when the local Sprawk was patrolling.

As if that was not bad enough, a couple of months ago, my other neighbour who is 101 years old, unfortunately had to go to live in a care home. Her relatives, who understandably need to rent/sell the house decided that this would be easier of the garden was laid bare. They asked the gardener who had tended it for the last few years since my neighbour could not do it herself, to cut everything down. This he refused so they got rid of him and set to themselves with saws, strimmers and brush cutters. All that now remains is a large patch of bare grass and soil with a few stumps where once there was a variety of mature flowering shrubs, fruit and berry trees etc

Needless to say, in the last couple of weeks the only birds coming to my feeders have been the usual woodpigeons, a couple of sparrows, a single blue tit and a great tit. So no more goldcrests, winter blackcaps, long tailed tits finches etc etc that I used to enjoy.

Not only have my neighbours completely destroyed some wonderful urban habitat, my immediate skyline is now devoid of any interest. I know that this is their property and they can do what they like but it is a complete disaster from my point of view. Personally I do not understand their thinking as, if I were looking to buy a house I would rather it had some mature features and then work from there. keep what I liked, and replace the rest. It will take many years to restore what was once there. In the meantime all my birds have decided that my feeding station is no longer suitable as there is no cover available from predators, places to simply forage or trees from which to stake their claims, build their nests etc.

I could cry at the wanton damage.:-C
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
What a sad story. The trouble is, many folks think a 'nice garden' is grass manicured to within a mm of its life and anything that makes it untidy (trees drop leaves in autumn) is banned.


Paul, I don't know if this will be possible for you or how much it would cost, but some tall shrubs or trees in large planters could help. If the birds have cover to help them feel safe, they will come to food and water.

Lee
 

Paul Longland

Well-known member
What a sad story. The trouble is, many folks think a 'nice garden' is grass manicured to within a mm of its life and anything that makes it untidy (trees drop leaves in autumn) is banned.


Paul, I don't know if this will be possible for you or how much it would cost, but some tall shrubs or trees in large planters could help. If the birds have cover to help them feel safe, they will come to food and water.

Lee

I do have some tallish mature shrubs and a dense climbing wisteria on the back wall of the house (had a pair of Wrens nesting in there this year) . The problem is that the birds now have to run the gauntlet across a barren wasteland on two sides to get to my garden. Also across the road to the front of the house is a park with open playing fields. (lots of thrushes in winter).

There are plenty of other people in the area who put food out for them so they are obviously going to go there instead.

To make matters worse, during the hot spell my pond pump failed and in the 24 hours it took to get the spare part and fix it I lost 2 large Orfe and 2 Koi. I am sure if the large London plane tree had still been offering shade to the pond they would not have died.
 

stuartvine

Well-known member
My neighbours are obsessed with keeping their lawn clean. Not surprising really, as it's astroturf (the horror, the horror)! They've even gone to the trouble of putting a spike arrangement on top of their fence to prevent pigeons using it. I'm not sure that it will be particularly effective as grey squirrels have no trouble running on top of the spikes... Having said that, they're proud of their exotic trees. These aren't very tall, but the birds that come to my feeders make full use of them.
 

HnehpetS

Wannabe Birder
Without wishing to turn your post into a Monty Python's Yorkshiremen Sketch.

My small back garden backed onto an arable field. We used to get all sorts of birds/wildlife in the field and then into our hedge and garden. Unfortunately, the field is now becoming a housing estate. Where I could get views of the distant hills from a bedroom, I can now look directly into my neighbours window! No more Hares, Herons - or Hirundae zooming across the grass tops. No more deer or hunting birds of prey.
The estate plans indicate a natural hedge barrier but not a tree/shrub has been planted yet. The only thing takes food from my feeder is the occasional squirrel that finds his way down six foot fence at the bottom of the garden.

You have my sympathies.
 
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