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is a whimbrel common to the N.East coast ? (1 Viewer)

kb57

Well-known member
Europe
Assuming the OP means 'NE England' and 'recently', the simple answer (supported by Mark's data) is - 'no, not common, but you're close to the time of year when you're more likely to see one.'
Interesting the Whitburn data shows a bigger post-breeding peak; I only seem to come across whimbrel in the NE (of England) during spring passage, but then I don't always get out much in July...
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
Assuming the OP means 'NE England' and 'recently', the simple answer (supported by Mark's data) is - 'no, not common, but you're close to the time of year when you're more likely to see one.'
Interesting the Whitburn data shows a bigger post-breeding peak; I only seem to come across whimbrel in the NE (of England) during spring passage, but then I don't always get out much in July...
Then the OP should have said that, he could have meant Aberdeen, Portland (Maine), Queensland or Vladivostok. All are on the northeast coast of somewhere.

David
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Then the OP should have said that, he could have meant Aberdeen, Portland (Maine), Queensland or Vladivostok. All are on the northeast coast of somewhere.

David
A quick 10 second check on the OP’s previous posts, there have been a total of 3 since he joined at the beginning of 2019 all of which reference the NE of England with two specifically referring to the NE coast of England so it would be fair to assume he is a/ referring to the NE coast of England in this thread and b/ may not have visited Birdforum very often since joining so may not have realised the global nature of the site.
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
A quick 10 second check on the OP’s previous posts, there have been a total of 3 since he joined at the beginning of 2019 all of which reference the NE of England with two specifically referring to the NE coast of England so it would be fair to assume he is a/ referring to the NE coast of England in this thread and b/ may not have visited Birdforum very often since joining so may not have realised the global nature of the site.
I don’t normally investigate posters’ locale or history. I am about to sin by making a huge generalisation, there are only two groups of people who normally say things like “north east” without qualifying it. Americans and English. If I was writing a question like that about my locality I would say “South-eastern Scotland” or “East Lothian”, I would never say the “south-east” because you may think I was talking about any of Kent, South Carolina, Crimea or Sydney.

David
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
I don’t normally investigate posters’ locale or history
Lol it wasn’t much of an ‘investigation‘! it just requires one tap on an avatar to see someone’s location - I only checked the comments to see if there was a clue to where the image was taken.

“I would never say the “south-east” because you may think I was talking about any of Kent, South Carolina, Crimea or Sydney”


If I say South East, I am usually referring to wind direction 😏
 

kb57

Well-known member
Europe
I learned whilst working in Aberdeenshire some years ago that there are other 'north easts', but inhabitants of the rest of the world must realise that for us there is only one North East. Although being from Co. Cleveland, Rob is dangerously close to being a Yorkshireman (which as everyone knows is Somewhere Down South)... However, a quick click on his name should have made it obvious at least to those in UK which NE coast he meant (I'd excuse some confusion from US-based birders who might've reasonably thought he was based on the south coast of Lake Erie).
To illustrate precisely where the centre of the world is for us, I remember a story a friend once told me a long time ago of running for the Newcastle train with his brother at King's Cross (London) station after lingering a little too long in the station bar.
They jumped on just before it left - then his brother, anxious that in their slightly inebriated state they might have got on the wrong train, loudly enquired 'does this train go to the Town?'
The reply from the other passengers was a reassuring 'Aye son, you're on the right train'.
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
Well to me “the toon” is not Newcastle, it’s Edinburgh. In my area “gaun up the toon” means getting the train to Waverley or a bus to St Andrews Square (Princes Street now).

David
 

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