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Is this a Stock Dove? (1 Viewer)

Peewit

Once a bird lover ... always a bird lover
hi there

Just photographed this chap in the back of my garden in Bedford (the untidy bit LOL) about an hour ago

Is it a Stock Dove or a 'captive' Dove of sorts ;).

I see it has the white embellishment on top of its bill :t:

I see that it has a red ring band on one leg and a yellow ring band on the other -

Are used ring bands ever brightly coloured if they are wild birds?
 

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MTem

Well-known member
Sorry no - looks like a (non) racing pigeon.

.... and yes bright colours are used on wild birds as a means of identifying them from a distance. Normally 3 or 4, with 1 or 2 on each leg in different colour combination. If you see one you need to note the colours on each leg, and which is above the other.

Mick
 
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Peewit

Once a bird lover ... always a bird lover
Sorry no - looks like a (non) racing pigeon.

Mick

Thank you for that - it is amazing what you find in your garden while cooking the Sunday dinner for the evening LOL

This chap was happy to nibble everything he could find for a long time.

Back to the wild, birds once more! o:)
 

02pepe47

Well-known member
Agree with MTem not a Stock dove, but a domestically bred hybrid, which may have some Stock dove inclusion.
For reference have attached a pic of the wild variety.
Pepe
 

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Peewit

Once a bird lover ... always a bird lover
Agree with MTem not a Stock dove, but a domestically bred hybrid, which may have some Stock dove inclusion.
For reference have attached a pic of the wild variety.
Pepe

Thanks Pepe - there is some resemblance going on between your picture and mine

Oh well, interesting to find out. :t:
 

stevethehydra

Well-known member
No need to invoke hybrids, this is a typical domestic Rock Pigeon. They are hugely varied in colour and pattern, but nearly all are the "cold" grey of their wild Rock Pigeon (aka Rock Dove) ancestor. Stock Dove is much closer to Woodpigeon in its "warmer" colour tones (although more like Rock Pigeon in size and structure), and much less likely than either to be seen in an urban garden...
 

ChrisKten

It's true, I quite like Pigeons
It's a Racing Pigeon, Kathy. It'll either find it's way home, become part of a Feral flock, or get killed by a Cat (it won't be street-smart like the ferals). I think those rings are because it was in a race... it didn't do too well ;)

If you can catch it, you can report it so the owner can collect it; or you can risk it remaining free... have a look here:

http://www.homingpigeons.co.uk/lostpigeon.htm
 

Peewit

Once a bird lover ... always a bird lover
No need to invoke hybrids, this is a typical domestic Rock Pigeon. They are hugely varied in colour and pattern, but nearly all are the "cold" grey of their wild Rock Pigeon (aka Rock Dove) ancestor. Stock Dove is much closer to Woodpigeon in its "warmer" colour tones (although more like Rock Pigeon in size and structure), and much less likely than either to be seen in an urban garden...

More interesting facts. It seems to be a mixture of all Doves and Pigeons together.

I have seen wild 'Rock Doves' nesting on the cliff face at Hunstantion, Norfolk over the years. i am sure that they are the real deal - the none chip eaters

One thing that was dfferent to me is the length of this birds neck - this bird stretched its neck to some length to keep an eye of for preditors.

I had not put any food down in the area it was feeding, so I wondered what it was eating from the paving stones - maybe some ants or earwigs (not it usual fayre! LOL)

It's a Racing Pigeon, Kathy. It'll either find it's way home, become part of a Feral flock, or get killed by a Cat (it won't be street-smart like the ferals). I think those rings are because it was in a race... it didn't do too well ;)

If you can catch it, you can report it so the owner can collect it; or you can risk it remaining free... have a look here:

http://www.homingpigeons.co.uk/lostpigeon.htm

Thank you Chris - will do.

The bird in question has now disappeared form view at the moment. Keeping an eye out for it to see if it is okay.

I can see our local Sprawk planning his dinner sooner than later :eek!:

Sad about the race it lost. Hopefully it finds it way back home once more - with a little human intervention (no cats I hope)
 
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MTem

Well-known member
Sad about the race it lost. Hopefully it finds it way back home once more - with a little human intervention (no cats I hope)

Don't hope for that too much. If it does get back home it will likely get its neck wrung. Pigeon racers are not sentimental and a bird that doesn't just fly straight home is useless as a racer, and as a future breeder - so just taking up space and eating feed.

Mick
 

ChrisKten

It's true, I quite like Pigeons
What Mick said can be true, Kathy, but it's not a guaranteed outcome. This advice might help you to decide what to do:

You may find that their details are stamped on the underside of the wing. If not, take note of the numbers on the ring on the bird’s leg and you will then be able to report the bird to the relevant pigeon racing group. They usually say they will contact you back within 48 hours, not including weekends, so you’ll need to be prepared to feed and house the bird in the meantime. However, we strongly advise that, on speaking to the owner, you check what will happen to the bird on its return. Our experience is that the usual response from the owner is that they do not want the bird and it will be culled as it has failed so be sure to check this won’t happen. You may be asked to let the bird go after a few days rest to find its own way home. We would advise against this for the reasons given above. We recommend that you insist the owner either pays for a courier or collects the bird in person, both to ensure the bird arrives safely and because this is a good way to ensure the owner really does want the bird back and won’t simply wring its neck.

In fact, if you have more time, the entire webpage is worth a read:

http://helpwildlife.co.uk/sick-or-injured-wildlife/racingpigeons/
 

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