Israel - Saxicola Species\Ssp. ID (1 Viewer)

Orvany24

Well-known member
A picture from recent days. Looks like one of the Eastern species.

Would appreciate any input.

Thanks in advance.

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HH75

Well-known member
Hi Orvany,
An 'eastern stonechat', I agree, and probably not Stejneger's (on range and on the generally pale colour of this bird, but it should be noted that fading and wear could make firm exclusion of Stejneger's impossible or almost so by late March). Whether it's maurus or a poorly-marked hemprichii or variegatus, I wouldn't like to say, but all of these are, at present, lumped as Siberian Stonechat anyway.
Regards,
Harry
 

Orvany24

Well-known member
Hi Orvany,
An 'eastern stonechat', I agree, and probably not Stejneger's (on range and on the generally pale colour of this bird, but it should be noted that fading and wear could make firm exclusion of Stejneger's impossible or almost so by late March). Whether it's maurus or a poorly-marked hemprichii or variegatus, I wouldn't like to say, but all of these are, at present, lumped as Siberian Stonechat anyway.

Thank you for your reply, Harry.

As far as I know, there's no record of Stejneger's in Israel, and based on color of upper-tail feathers, this individual doesn't seem to be one, though "fading and wear" could be a factor here, as you noted.

As for the other three species, I was hoping to at least rule out hemprichii (more common here than the other two) - which, by the way, is referred to in Israel as Caspian Stonechat. But by my Id skills, it's too tough to call.

Thanks again.
 

janvanderbrugge

Well-known member
Quote: Would appreciate any input.

Shalom, Orvany,
Unfortunately I have nothing substantial to add to Harry HH's reaction of yesterday; anyway, it made me check the Helm guide "Stonechats - A Guide to the Genus Saxicola" (London, 2002) in my book collection. Properly speaking, I suppose this might be superfluous information to you, but I saw that this book has very detailed descriptions of the Saxicola (sub)species in their several plumages, and a number of pictures as well. As there is always the possibility that you don't know or own this guide, I decided to mention it here.
And anyhow it is always nice to see such photo's of this lovely bird group. In Holland we have only S.torquatus rubicola, which has a tendency to stay over in winter (severe winters are rare nowadays).
Kol tuv, ubehatslakha 'al nisayon lazihuy. drishat shalom mezevenaar!
Jan van der Brugge
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
In Holland we have only S.torquatus rubicola, which has a tendency to stay over in winter (severe winters are rare nowadays).
Well, not quite - you have Saxicola rubicola :t: you need to go to Subsaharan Africa to get S. torquatus, on current taxonomy. But you should also get occasional S. maurus and S. stejnegeri in the Netherlands, when the wind blows from the east in October o:)
 

MJB

Well-known member
Quote: Would appreciate any input.

Shalom, Orvany,
Unfortunately I have nothing substantial to add to Harry HH's reaction of yesterday; anyway, it made me check the Helm guide "Stonechats - A Guide to the Genus Saxicola" (London, 2002) in my book collection.
Jan van der Brugge

The taxonomy of this genus has undergone two major revisions since that book, and so for it to remain useful, the texts and the illustration titles in many cases will need changing....:eek!:
MJB
 

Orvany24

Well-known member
Thank you, Jan (greetings back) and everyone else. Hopefully next time I'll run into an adult male of this species, which would make the ID a much easier task.
 

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