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Ivory-billed Woodpecker (formerly updates) (1 Viewer)

dacol

Well-known member
John Mariani said:
A question - maybe someone out there knows the answer. On Dr. Geoff Hill's web pages he says that IBWO sounds (kents/double knocks) were heard on 41 separate occasions by the search team. How do they respond to these sound detections? Is there a set procedure they follow? Do they sit quietly and wait, play back calls of IBWOs hoping for a response, or try to approach the subject? I'm interested in knowing what they actually do under those circumstances.


Their paper at

http://www.ace-eco.org/articles/78.html

has a long discussion of their sound recordings.

Regarding playback they state the following:

"Members of our search team never played kent calls or attempted to mimic double knocks, and we never encountered another birdwatcher in the area. We are confident that the sounds that we recorded were not made by a human attempting to mimic an Ivory-billed Woodpecker."

Dalcio
 

one

Active member
naples said:
I have heard approx. 12 series of Blue Jay kents over the last year in my back yard, usually just before they steal the cats food. Each time it ended with a typical Blue Jay call and sometimes started with one. The pitch is constant.
I would rule out Blue Jay.

Funny you mention that naples. I left out information in my previous post regarding blue jays giving kent-like calls in a suburban parking lot. People feed the cats in the very same parking lot where i have heard the kent-like calls. i observed the blue jays giving kent-like calls in the very location where people leave cat food for the local strays. Again, the kent-like calls i heard were mixed with regular blue jay calls.
 

James Blake

chasing the shadow of a lowskimming gull
Hi all

Just had a very brief look at the list of possible kents and double knocks from Florida. The two types of sound do not seem to have been recorded together on more than a very few occasions. There were instances of kents and double knocks being recorded reasonably closely together (in time and space), but rarely forming a real sequence.

From what is known of IBWOs and similar peckers, is this as expected? Or would we expect to have more instances of birds making the two sounds in close sequence?

Yours putatively
James
 

Russ Jones

Well-known member
Some of those "kents" sure sound like trees creaking as they would if they were swaying in the breeze. Does anyone else find this a reasonable possibility?

Cheers,

Russ
 

emupilot

Well-known member
Russ Jones said:
Some of those "kents" sure sound like trees creaking as they would if they were swaying in the breeze. Does anyone else find this a reasonable possibility?

Cheers,

Russ

I don't know if the frequency spectrum of creaking trees can line up with the historic Ivory-bill "kent", but since all of the calls occur during the day, we can probably eliminate wind as a possibility since that would give sound signals around the clock.
 

theveeb

Well-known member
choupique1 said:
at the conclusion of this searching season - photo will come.... either from...
1. the florida location - WEST of where the previous sightings occured though.....

2. one of three places in La.... two of the places... the location will not be made public.....one place.. ya'll all know where that is...

at this time.. and in the upcoming season..... the searchers are proceeding the way they should have all along.... with lessons learned from previous searches.

IF.. it is me... that gets a clear photo or video...... it will come from private land.. and i have been asked by the landowner..... not to disclose the location.....if i were a betting man... i would lay the money down... B :)

Looking at this post and what I remember of Tim's descriptions/clues I'm guessing that you might be his "informant." Are you? Any descriptions of what you saw that you can provide if you are (don't need to know where your encounters were though I'm guessing WEST of the Choctawhatchee.) Just wondering if you got better looks than what was reported in the Auburn paper.

the veeb
 

MMinNY

Well-known member
Not likely he's the informant.

A lot of interesting stuff on Fla. Surfbirds, and Laura Erickson via Cyberthrush.

Here's a list of Fla. sightings over the last 100 years or so. Some I knew about; some I didn't:

http://myfwc.com/imperiledspecies/reports/FloridaReportRecoveryPlanFinal_June06.pdf

Fla. FWC press release on the Auburn material:

http://myfwc.com/whatsnew/06/statewide/ibw.html

Apparently the USFWS hasn't updated its site lately.


theveeb said:
Looking at this post and what I remember of Tim's descriptions/clues I'm guessing that you might be his "informant." Are you? Any descriptions of what you saw that you can provide if you are (don't need to know where your encounters were though I'm guessing WEST of the Choctawhatchee.) Just wondering if you got better looks than what was reported in the Auburn paper.

the veeb
 
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curunir

Well-known member
theveeb said:
Looking at this post and what I remember of Tim's descriptions/clues I'm guessing that you might be his "informant." Are you? Any descriptions of what you saw that you can provide if you are (don't need to know where your encounters were though I'm guessing WEST of the Choctawhatchee.) Just wondering if you got better looks than what was reported in the Auburn paper.

the veeb
The informant needs a nickname. "Deep Throat" has been taken. Maybe "Swamp Thing"? Sounds lame, better ideas are welcome.
 

Andigena

Well-known member
I must say I am encouraged that the Florida Wildlife Commission is going to fund Dr. Hill's work this coming season, and that the chairman of the Commission is very encouraging in general about the news, as are the authorities at the NWFlorida Water Management District.

"The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is working with the federal government and some private agencies to provide additional funding for Hill's team, agency spokesman Willie Puz said. Puz said funding is in the early stages and he didn't know how much the researchers would receive. "

"Florida officials praised the early evidence."

"This will be fantastic if we can confirm the woodpeckers are there," conservation commission Chairman Rodney Barreto said in a statement. "Florida is the only state besides Arkansas to come close to confirmation in roughly 40 years..." Quotes from Forbes magazine article.

In the end it is far more important what these State of Florida officials, and the USFWS officials, think about the IBWO evidence and reports.......than what we, and the birdwatchers of the world, think.
 

timeshadowed

Time is a Shadow
theveeb,

The first step in trying to figure out who Tim's informat was, is to eliminate ALL posters that you feel Tim would not trust. This will leave very few posters with which to speculate.
 

John Mariani

Well-known member
emupilot said:
From the paper,

However, none of the 210 putative kent calls recorded by our listening stations were associated with any known Blue Jay vocalizations.



They never played back calls, at least.

This is interesting - given that on 41 separate occasions members of the team heard what they believed to be IBWOs (kent calls/double knocks). and that they were not attempting to attract the birds with recordings, then they had two options - sit and wait, hoping the bird(s) would come closer, or attempt to approach the bird(s).

The main reason I find this interesting is that 41 times they heard putative IBWO sounds while in the field, yet based on my reading of their field notes there were only 3 sightings accompanied by IBWO sounds. So 38 times team members heard birds but didn't see anything? That means that only about 1 in every 13-14 sound detections by people in the field was accompanied by a (brief) sighting, and since Geoff Hill's sighting actually preceded his hearing the bird, this means that only about 1 in 20 times a sighting was made subsequent to the bird(s) being heard.

That strikes me as a pretty low sound-to-sight ratio - at least for a woodpecker that is actively being searched for.
 

Sidewinder

Well-known member
Emupilot suggested: "It might be a good idea to set up a "control" audio station in the woods near Auburn where the scientists looked at the size of Pileated Woodpecker holes and then process the data in the same way as their experimental stations. Blue Jays and nuthatches may be present there, whereas not at the study site, but that analysis might put to bed the apparently very small possibility that something besides IBWO was making all those kent calls and double-knocks."

Excellent suggestion, indeed, but to control for investigator bias, those screening the calls should not be informed of the location where recordings were made (i.e., they should be screening "blindly" recordings from both the Florida and Auburn sites). It would be interesting to learn how many sounds identified as "kents" or "double-knocks" would be interpreted from the Auburn location. Unfortunately, the Auburn location is likely much closer to human disturbance, so perhaps another good (or better) control would be a remote location further north where PIWO still occurs but where IBWO would clearly be absent. This would be a problem, however, if other species calling were to tip off the screener where the recordings were from. It would be ideal to train screeners who knew essentially nothing about birds and, therefore, could be as objective as possible in identifying candidate calls.
 

Mike Johnston

Well-known member
MMinNY said:
Not likely he's the informant.
Mmmm...I wonder. I think he might have accidently outed himself a few days ago.;) I had my suspicions when I received a message from the thread on the 26th which said something revealing, but which wasn't there when I logged on? Only this was: Post #7250
woops nevermind
The plot thickens. Or have I been reading too much Hercules Poirot? :t:
 

MMinNY

Well-known member
Not having read the post in question, I can't say. My doubts and suspicions are based on past history.

Maybe we should start a couple of pools. Who is Tim's informant? Who will get the definitive photo and when? (Agnostics could join in; I'm not so sure about atheists. . .I guess we could have a not within 5 years category as a catchall.) B :)


Mike Johnston said:
The plot thickens. Or have I been reading too much Hercules Poirot? :t:
 

James Blake

chasing the shadow of a lowskimming gull
choupique1 said:
woops nevermind

Well Choupique, this is an intriguing post indeed!

A bit of a shot in the dark: in the past you've written about features you believe to be diagnostic but which don't appear in the literature. Are you hinting that these features are in the Florida field notes?

best wishes
James
 
From Rick Wright

Ivory-billed Woodpecker: What Are “Field Notes”?

An easy question with an easy answer: they’re notes made in the field with the bird in view. But the newly e-published Auburn University paper conflates genuine field notes with the post factum written narratives of a sighting, calling the latter “transcribed field notes.”

The only field notes in sight here are the pages ripped from Tyler Hicks’s notebooks. And those are extremely interesting and profoundly suggestive pages; but the accounts that follow them are by no stretch of the imagination “transcriptions.” They are written memories, and should have been treated as such, with full information given about the circumstances of their composition and the time that passed between the original sighting and the drafting of the narratives. To suggest, as the paper does, that these are simply neatly typed copies of words scribbled in the field falls somewhere between sloppy and dishonest.

anyway, see below for an IBWO pic:
 

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