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Ivory-billed Woodpecker (formerly updates) (1 Viewer)

LabradorDuck

Well-known member
That's the first I've heard of IBWO occupying the same habitat as RCWO. I was under the impression that the Ivory-billed was a bird of dense bald-cypress swamps. Wikipedia mentions them as occurring in pine forest as well, but I still don't see them spending much time in the kind of open savannas preferred by the Red-cockaded.

Regardless of whether or not there are still a few IBWO kicking about, it's not hard to see how that species declined so drastically when you consider the extensive clear-cutting of the cypress swamps. Even though there's plenty of swamp remaining, the trees that now form the canopy are tiny compared to the few old-growth trees that survived the onslaught. It really is a completely different world between old-growth and secondary forest. RCWO habitat can be restored with a few well-placed flamethrowers, but IBWO habitat would take centuries to return.
 

Bird_Bill

Well-known member
That's the first I've heard of IBWO occupying the same habitat as RCWO. I was under the impression that the Ivory-billed was a bird of dense bald-cypress swamps. Wikipedia mentions them as occurring in pine forest as well, but I still don't see them spending much time in the kind of open savannas preferred by the Red-cockaded.

Regardless of whether or not there are still a few IBWO kicking about, it's not hard to see how that species declined so drastically when you consider the extensive clear-cutting of the cypress swamps. Even though there's plenty of swamp remaining, the trees that now form the canopy are tiny compared to the few old-growth trees that survived the onslaught. It really is a completely different world between old-growth and secondary forest. RCWO habitat can be restored with a few well-placed flamethrowers, but IBWO habitat would take centuries to return.

Have to wonder just how much area was/is involved.Would seem at edges of overlap of ecosystems.Also question if it might of been very specific case(s) were R-CWO had ventured into areas were short-leaf rather than long-leaf pine were encountered.I have to be objective across the spectrum.There are and have been some extremely talented people working with R-CWO.They're out there and stand a good a chance of an encounter with IBWO if it is in fact present in a very tiny and specific ecosytem/enviroment.We have not heard from them in this regard up to this point in time.

As clear cutting is mentioned,rail ties that were used for tracks to transport lumber to mills was often cyprus also.
After draining and construction of easements/railways,devastaion was complete in those areas.
 
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dacol

Well-known member
13th Anniversary of David Kullivan's First Sighting of IBWOs

Today (April 1st, 2012) is the 13th anniversary of David Kullivan's sighting of a pair of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers in the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area, Slidell, Lousiana. Kullivan had a second sighing in the same area in December 27, 1999. See
http://losbird.org/los_news_189_00feb.htm
 

Larry Lade

Moderator
I participated in a two week bird survey in Arkansas in 2006 looking for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker. I found no IBWO nor did anyone else on the two teams which were there during the same two week period.
 

cyberthrush

Well-known member
How many have thought that the Kullivan sighting might have been an April Fool's joke gone wild.

Kulivan was interviewed/grilled by innumerable people NONE of whom, so far as I'm aware, ever felt that it was in any way an April Fools joke (mind you he reported the sighting well after the April 1st day on which it occurred). His competency and accuracy have been questioned, but not his sincerity.
 

Larry Lade

Moderator
I did meet with and visit with several of the principal players involved in the IBWO sightings/reports. They all seemed to me to be sincere in their reporting of data.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Is anyone here who has access to this article?

Lammertink, J. M.. 1995. No more hope for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker Campephilus principalis. Cotinga 3: 45ā€“47.

I would be very grateful If you could send me a PDF copy of this article.
 

Larry Lade

Moderator

I read the article using the URL above. This piece is from 1995. I am wondering if Lammertink has written any recent reports of his assessment of the status of the IBWO?

* Did meet and chat with Lammertink when I was doing a two week survey in Arkansas (2006). At this time his feeling was that the IBWO was probably extinct (as I recall).
 

Ruff

Two birds in one.
If the Ivory Billed Woodpecker is gone, maybe it would be a good candidate for DNA resurrection? Sufficient protected areas must surely exist for them now and one could even conceive of Pileated parents raising them. Eccentric billionaire needed though, or a Whooping Crane sized public effort....
 
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IBWO Sightings

Hi my name is SebastianPCTTB abd I am new to bird forum and I was encouraged to make an account after viewing quite a few Ivory-bill sightings so I want to hear anybody who has had a first-hand account of an Ivory-bill sighting for private research that I am conducting, please share if you have seen this majestic and elusive bird, and have a great rest of your day and week!

-Sebastian

P.S. I know Iā€™m a little posting this after all the debate.
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
... I want to hear anybody who has had a first-hand account of an Ivory-bill sighting for private research that I am conducting, please share if you have seen this majestic and elusive bird, and have a great rest of your day and week!

Last one seen around 1991 in Cuba, according to Lynx HBW. Is the person / people who saw this one still alive?
 
Thank you Nutcracker, I was not able to find a 1991 sighting but I did find a sighting by Jerome A. Jackson in Cuba in 1988, around the Ojito De Agua area. Thank you very much though.
 

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