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Ivory-Billed Woodpecker Refined Search Techniques for 2021 (1 Viewer)

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motiheal

Well-known member
I offered to write a summary on one page for distribution and posting in possible IBWO areas, and this is the result, using David Sibley's excellent art and refined instructions for closer encounters in the field.

Reward: Help Find The Rare Ivory-Billed Woodpecker: America’s Most Elusive Bird

The Ivory-Billed Woodpecker (IBWO) is a crow-sized bird of Southeast US swamps and woods. It has not been photographed well since the 1930s. If you are a hunter, outdoorsperson, birder, fisher, or spend time in the IBWO’s habitats, you can help find it.

Identification (from USFW)



1612192570244.png

Sounds:
Only the IBWO makes a very loud and quick “double knock” on wood. Other sounds include soft “kents” that sound like a toy trumpet.

Encounters With Humans: Reports have shown that there is a higher chance of an encounter with the IBWO from kayaks, canoes, sitting, tree-stands, blinds, and on horseback (non-human silhouettes). The IBWO is wary of walking humans and seldom approaches closer than 100 yards.

Documentation: Video images are better than still images because they can show behavior that can help ID. If you believe you have one in sight, whatever the distance, turn on a video camera and record the area.

Reports of Sightings:
 
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Farnboro John

Well-known member
David Sibley's art is public domain? Are you sure about that?
I would very much doubt that it is out of copyright.

In addition, kent sounds have been shown beyond doubt to be made by species other than IBWO, as have double knocks. So this material is actively misleading. (It is also actively misleading in suggesting that encounters are more likely in various circumstances as there are no confirmed reports for the last seventy years.)

Still cameras with telephoto lenses are far more likely to record birds identifiably than wide area video that may well focus n the wrong thing. wide-angle video spray and pray doesn't cut it, as already evidenced.

In fact, it would be difficult to put together a worse guide to searching for IBWO.

John
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
The illustrations you have posted actually have "©David Allen Sibley" printed on them.
 

Bismarck Honeyeater

Barely known member
I offered to write a summary on one page for distribution and posting in possible IBWO areas, and this is the result, using David Sibley's excellent art and refined instructions for closer encounters in the field.

Reward: Help Find The Rare Ivory-Billed Woodpecker: America’s Most Elusive Bird

The Ivory-Billed Woodpecker (IBWO) is a crow-sized bird of Southeast US swamps and woods. It has not been photographed well since the 1930s. If you are a hunter, outdoorsperson, birder, fisher, or spend time in the IBWO’s habitats, you can help find it.

Identification (from USFW)



View attachment 1366975

Sounds:
Only the IBWO makes a very loud and quick “double knock” on wood. Other sounds include soft “kents” that sound like a toy trumpet.

Encounters With Humans: Reports have shown that there is a higher chance of an encounter with the IBWO from kayaks, canoes, sitting, tree-stands, blinds, and on horseback (non-human silhouettes). The IBWO is wary of walking humans and seldom approaches closer than 100 yards.

Documentation: Video images are better than still images because they can show behavior that can help ID. If you believe you have one in sight, whatever the distance, turn on a video camera and record the area.

Reports of Sightings:
I reckon if I put that poster up around my area in the UK there would certainly be ‘positive’ responses.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
The only photographs taken ‘well’ or that appear to be of an IB on those video programs is the historical black and white ones from the 1930s Singer tract. Anyway, it’s up to you what you put on your poster. The layout is nice.

Ps I enjoyed watching the videos even if just from a general birding point of view so thanks for posting them.
 
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motiheal

Well-known member
The only photographs taken ‘well’ or that appear to be of an IB on those video programs is the historical black and white ones from the 1930s Singer tract. Anyway, it’s up to you what you put on your poster. The layout is nice.

Ps I enjoyed watching the videos even if just from a general birding point of view so thanks for posting them.
That's why I used the word "well."
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
That's why I used the word "well."
but no photos at all since 1930s - so the only one taken ’well’ or at all on the videos is the one taken 90 odd years ago - there hasn’t been any since - your wording implies otherwise which is why I suggested removing the ‘well’ so it reads:

”It has not been photographed since the 1930s”

That was what I meant 👍
 

StuartReeves

Local rarity
I share Farnboro John's concerns about favouring video over still images. Further, the emphasis on behaviour to identify the subject bird seems a bit odd. For a start we know little about IBWO behaviour so there are no diagnostic behavioral characteristics that could be used to confirm the ID. Also, IBWO is/was a large, obvious, black and white woodpecker so the ID should be obvious from any even half-decent photograph or video.
 

Gastronaut

_______________
I share Farnboro John's concerns about favouring video over still images. Further, the emphasis on behaviour to identify the subject bird seems a bit odd. For a start we know little about IBWO behaviour so there are no diagnostic behavioral characteristics that could be used to confirm the ID. Also, IBWO is/was a large, obvious, black and white woodpecker so the ID should be obvious from any even half-decent photograph or video.
Clutching at straws?
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
I wonder whether, given the prevalence of hunters or generally gun totin’ individuals, in the search areas, plastering notices around swamp areas offering a reward is a good idea? Advertising a reward puts a monetary value on a bird species that could be interpreted as an opportunity for a bounty - we have a track record of hunting birds into extinction so I am not sure the last individuals of any species are protected from the risks that might be associated with it’s potential monetary value on the black market as a taxidermy cash cow. In the least, it could result in Pileated WO or other species being shot in mistaken identity.
 

raymie

Well-known member
United States
I wonder whether, given the prevalence of hunters or generally gun totin’ individuals, in the search areas, plastering notices around swamp areas offering a reward is a good idea? Advertising a reward puts a monetary value on a bird species that could be interpreted as an opportunity for a bounty - we have a track record of hunting birds into extinction so I am not sure the last individuals of any species are protected from the risks that might be associated with it’s potential monetary value on the black market as a taxidermy cash cow. In the least, it could result in Pileated WO or other species being shot in mistaken identity.
Just make sure that the sign says to get the money you have to lead a researcher to a living bird and it would probably be fine.
 
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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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