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James Webb Telescope (1 Viewer)

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Can't miss the news today of this one pic

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/...image/main_image_deep_field_smacs0723-5mb.jpg
NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has produced the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. Known as Webb’s First Deep Field, this image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is overflowing with detail.

Thousands of galaxies – including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared – have appeared in Webb’s view for the first time. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground.

This deep field, taken by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), is a composite made from images at different wavelengths, totaling 12.5 hours – achieving depths at infrared wavelengths beyond the Hubble Space Telescope’s deepest fields, which took weeks.

A whole set tomorrow. This is something else then our birding scopes!
 

tenex

reality-based
[quoting nasa.gov!] "This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground."
An angular size doesn't depend on where you're standing.
After a news item yesterday on the James Webb telescope I didn't understand its orbit.
Nor do most people, including at news outlets, which commonly say it's "a million miles above the earth". No one even makes an effort at science education today, so let's just look at some pretty pictures (which many will think are just like Hubble all over again but more expensive).

And this amazing telescope got named after someone who wasn't even a scientist.
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Ah well, they try to bring science back to laymen's understanding. I go agree many journalists nowadays do little effort delving into the specifics. Probably deadline pressures as everybody is pressured nowadays.

But hey, they still have the pretty pictures!
 

MiddleRiver

Well-known member
United States
All true... but I think it's fantastic that press is at least noticing. There have been any number of incredible space/astro events over the years, that people are not even really aware of. The people doing the work are fanatically dedicated and qualified, and in my estimation the work is worth every penny of my tax dollars.

The images are stunning and the reality of what they depict is mind-blowing.
 

opisska

Jan Ebr
Czech Republic
Speaking as professionally almost an astronomer and also someone doing a lot of science outreach, I am very happy about the PR done for JWST. There hasn't been an astronomy topic so broadly popular with common people than this in a very long time, it gets people really interested in science, we get people asking about it all the time, coming to outreach events just to learn more about it etc... Yeah sometimes something can be done better, but this does a huge amount of work for the public perception of science.
 

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
After the first picture became available yesterday I circulated it to a few friends and relatives describing the JWT as the greates accomplishment of humankind. There is nothing so pure and innocent as the search for knowledge.

John
 

tenex

reality-based
After the first picture became available yesterday I circulated it to a few friends and relatives describing the JWT as the greates accomplishment of humankind. There is nothing so pure and innocent as the search for knowledge.
The world is so full of cynicism and irrationality today that people forget all about that. A dose of awe is in order.

(As an achievement relative to current technology, I'm not sure that JWST tops Apollo 11... and the public interest certainly doesn't. But it is impressive.)
 
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Lisa W

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