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Jimi Hendrix found not guilty (1 Viewer)

Mike C

Emeritus President at Burnage Rugby Club
accidental escapes and deliberate releases was pretty much the "story" I was told when I was shown my first "wild" Ring-necked Parakeet in the 80's
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Yep, the UK birds (and most invasive populations elsewhere, as far as I know) are the Indian [sub]species. Better adapted to cold winters (northern edge of the range, in the Himalaya), if nothing else.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
The eye-brow raising part of the article is this
By 1961, birds were a more popular pets than cats and dogs in the UK, with 11 million birds in captivity, of various species, and it seems obvious there would be an increase in escapes, researchers said.

(I have recently counted up to 25 different birds of this species overflying our garden in half an hour)

Niels
 

aeshna5

Well-known member
Yep, the UK birds (and most invasive populations elsewhere, as far as I know) are the Indian [sub]species. Better adapted to cold winters (northern edge of the range, in the Himalaya), if nothing else.

I thought I read a paper about a year or so back that the African + Asian birds were genetically distinct + the sub-species were elevated to full species status?
 

Paul Chapman

Well-known member
I thought I read a paper about a year or so back that the African + Asian birds were genetically distinct + the sub-species were elevated to full species status?

Some details on separation in the BB paper that assigned them to the Indian subspecies. I do not remember comments on genetics.

All the best

Paul
 

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aeshna5

Well-known member
I thought there was an active programme to gas the roosts - whatever subspecies the bloody things are:C

Laurie -

Never heard this + I live in the heart of RNP territory. They are on General Licence so can be controlled where they are a problem to crops, etc.

Monk Parakeets that were starting to increase were largely removed before they became too numerous

They do seem to be a "marmite" bird regarding enthusiasm for them or not. In Kensington Gardens they are very popular with some tourists who have the birds perched on them as they feed them.

Though I appreciate they shouldn't be here, they do provide one of the urban spectacles as the tight flocks fly low into roost.
 

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