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k10D Bigma settings (1 Viewer)

geordie graham

Well-known member
Hi Nick I am shooting in jpeg.Keep meaning to shoot in Raw but I am not fully up to speed with photo processing.I have got Elements 5,will that let me open my Raw files?.
Graham
 

geordie graham

Well-known member
Hi Geordi Graham,

I have just joined this interesting forum. Have you tried adjusting the in camera settings to address lack of contrast colour etc.

Press the "Menu" button near the top left corner of the screen. The first menu should be "Rec Mode". Scroll down to Saturation, Sharpness and Contrast. Move them all to +1 for a situation like the photographs. I will "boost" the image a little. Play around with the setting until you get the look you're after right out of the camera.

In australia, the sun is quite harsh, so I have the contrast set at -1 most of the time, otherwise I get blown highlights.

Regards

Hi RalfR,
Sorry i have took so long to answer your post.Thanks for the info will have a play around next time i`m out.

Graham
 

Spot Focus

Well-known member
Hi Nick I am shooting in jpeg.Keep meaning to shoot in Raw but I am not fully up to speed with photo processing.I have got Elements 5,will that let me open my Raw files?.
Graham
Hi Graham sorry I don't know whether Elements 5 will let you view Raw files ;) I know photoshop 7 won't :eek!: photoshop bridge will let you. There is software that comes with the K10 but I use Silkypix as my Raw converter ;) That is the software I used to process your owl image;)
 

tomkeet

Well-known member
Hi Graham,
I been using my Sigma 50-500 with a K10D for nearly a year now and I was not totally satisfied with the results, sharpness mainly. So just tested front and back focus and adjusted it, seems to have made a difference. Still more testing to do.
Also started using Photoshop Lightroom 2 mush easer than Elements 5 or CS2 etc, more geared to wards photography.
Tom
 

Ultra Lite

Well-known member
Hi Brian.
Have posted a couple of photo`s below that were taken last week using a beanbag on top of the car.Maybe I am being a bit picky but I expected them to be a bit sharper/more colour.It may be that my PC monitor is not up to scratch( only cost £150 ) as they look better on the LCD monitor.Once put through Elements 5 they were better, I just think coming out of a £700 lens the originals should look better.Looking at them again perhaps instead of using Centre focus I should have used Select.

Graham

View attachment 133339 View attachment 133340

My advice - get closer and use a tripod.

Remember, once you get beyond about 60 feet air turbulence is going to start compromising quality no matter what else you do.

Something like this:
 

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Spot Focus

Well-known member
Hi Graham,
I been using my Sigma 50-500 with a K10D for nearly a year now and I was not totally satisfied with the results, sharpness mainly. So just tested front and back focus and adjusted it, seems to have made a difference. Still more testing to do.
Also started using Photoshop Lightroom 2 mush easer than Elements 5 or CS2 etc, more geared to wards photography.
Tom
Hi Tom please tell me more about your adjustments
 

mikfoz

It's not a competition. Watch the birdy!
I've been using a Bigma and a K10 for a month or so now and I have to agree with Ultra Lite. You can use a Bigma to take some brilliant shots if you use the anti-shake on the K10 and judiciously using a tripod will give great results as well. Remember to switch off the anti-shake if it's on a tripod or bean bag, though.

I tend to use pattern metering unless the lighting is dreadfully contrasty, in which case I go for spot metering on the subject, lock and recompose if necessary. For moving subjects you need to be on constant spot autofocus. For stationary subjects you need to be on spot single autofocus and then lock and realign. You simply can't use pattern autofocus on a long telephoto as it has no depth of field and ends up hunting in any sort of clutter. The only exception would be if you're tracking a flying bird with no foreground clutter or near background - i.e. a sky shot or over water. The tiniest bit of foliage will irritate it to death and send it all over the place. This is true for all long tele lenses on any camera. True, you'll end up hunting if you pan through foliage on spot, but again this is true for all other methods.

Check out my gallery for plenty of perfectly acceptably sharp shots using this method.
 
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