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Keep your cat inside during spring (1 Viewer)

CalvinFold

Registered User
Supporter
I'm less interested in where the blame lies than doing something about those issues, such as free-ranging cats, where we both know what the problems are and how they can be relatively simply resolved. In this case, it's fairly simple - don't let your moggie out to kill wildlife, impose themselves on others' gardens, etc. Sorting out the more significant problem of human overpopulation is a lot harder but that doesn't mean we shouldn't address those issues that can be resolved.
:t:
:clap:
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Dilemma time? A good neighbour runs a small registered charity that catches, treats and neuters primarily stray cats ( kittens, adults and some housed pets). All voluntary, no paid staff. Whilst many are rehomed, a fair few are returned to the area where they lived as feral. I am very aware of the impact cats have on wildlife.
So my question is, " Should I support the work they do, solely on the premise that they are trying to reduce the number of strays by doctoring, chipping and finding homes for these strays?"
 
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Farnboro John

Well-known member
Dilemma time? A good neighbour runs a small registered charity that catches, treats and neuters primarily stray cats ( kittens, adults and some housed pets). All voluntary, no paid staff. Whilst many are rehomed, a fair few are returned to the area where they lived as feral. I am very aware of the impact cats have on wildlife.
So my question is, " Should I support the work they do, solely on the premise that they are trying to reduce the number of strays by doctoring, chipping and finding homes for these strays?"

Even if they are let loose, they will (a) waste matings by uncaught ferals/loose pets etc; (b) try to hold territory and move on other strays etc and (c) eventually die without replacing themselves.

All these things are better than the status quo.

So while I believe they should actually be killed on capture, its worth supporting the efforts that are being made.

John
 

Nayshiftin

New member
United Kingdom
Some cats may be but mine sits next to me and I've had the robin eat the crumbs on the table and the cat begs me for the butter of my toast in the morning. Yes, I think I'll let the cat out as the birds fly about eating all the insects and dropping their nasties whilst the cat annoys me indoors and out. Why did I get a cat ? I would have been better just feeding the wild birds. Jackdaws have gone now my alarm clock is not as loud but the cat still knows to get up mamma it is feed me time. Oh and put water out for the birds because I drink it after they have a bath in it. They live in harmony here. Now that vole he brought in so pleased with himself ... I however want to kill them magpies for scaring off my blue tits. hmmm, The sparrow hawk thing for making a mess with a pigeon and me blaming the cat. Oh, keep the birds in the wild. Nature will do its best whatever. I love them all.
 

Tired

Well-known member
United States
Don't let your cat kill any wildlife, including voles, and don't blame the birds for behaving as instinct teaches them to. That's nature. They scare each other away, and eat each other.
 

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