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Large-billed Leaf Warbler or Arctic Warber, Jiangsu Province, China (1 Viewer)

deanman

Active member
Please help ID the warbler, Large-billed Leaf Warbler or Arctic Warber. No call or sound recorded. Photo was taken today. Tks.
 

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Grahame Walbridge

Well-known member
It is one of the 'Arctic' Warbler complex IMHO, on account of a combination of short p1, lack of emarginated p6 and long pp, and quite possibly borealis; individuals with unusually dark bare parts have been observed (rarely) in the region, in Hong Kong for example, which may originate from Alaska (?) where similar birds appear to be regular, previously recognized as a distinct taxon kennicotti it has now subsumed by nominate the form.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/1...1.1187381068.1619451551-1774377679.1616000388

For comparison with LBLW see https://www.shanghaibirding.com/birds-of-china/large-billed-leaf-warbler/ note in particular, darker crown and different bill structure and any pale at the bill base is pink/flesh in tone, similar to Pale-legged and Sakhalin Leaf Warblers, its closest relatives.



Grahame
 
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KenM

Well-known member
Apart from all that has been said deanman, I believe your first image shows a “classic” Arctic Warbler profile...a long relatively “deep“ barrel of white under-tail coverts which in turn gives a “short-tailed” impression, apart from P.sibilatrix (Wood Warbler) these are the only two Phylloscopus species that “I’m aware of”(always questionable) to show such a profile?

Cheers
 

HouseCrow

Well-known member
@KenM You mean Arctic Warbler complex I think? I am not sure which species occur there but I suspect at least Graham's confusion species are possible vagrants too...

cheers,
Gerben
 

HouseCrow

Well-known member
Thanks Grahame, I thought as much. So the arctic warbler complex is a 'problem' for the entire East-Asian pacific region (so to speak)
I was not sure if there is not a 4th species mudding the complex

cheers,
Gerben
 

deanman

Active member
It is one of the 'Arctic' Warbler complex IMHO, on account of a combination of short p1, lack of emarginated p6 and long pp, and quite possibly borealis; individuals with unusually dark bare parts have been observed (rarely) in the region, in Hong Kong for example, which may originate from Alaska (?) where similar birds appear to be regular, previously recognized as a distinct taxon kennicotti it has now subsumed by nominate the form.

Arctic Warbler Macaulay Library ML104252471

For comparison with LBLW see Large-billed Leaf Warbler | Shanghai Birding 上海观鸟 note in particular, darker crown and different bill structure and any pale at the bill base is pink/flesh in tone, similar to Pale-legged and Sakhalin Leaf Warblers, its closest relatives.



Grahame
Thanks your great help for the ID. The Warbler's toe and tarsus is more dark/black than others Arctic Warbler here before. And my friend told me maybe LBLW for this type have the similar color toe and tarsus. And other friend told me maybe it's old age Arctic Warbler borealis, but I not sure for no photos can check. Thanks again.
 

deanman

Active member
Apart from all that has been said deanman, I believe your first image shows a “classic” Arctic Warbler profile...a long relatively “deep“ barrel of white under-tail coverts which in turn gives a “short-tailed” impression, apart from P.sibilatrix (Wood Warbler) these are the only two Phylloscopus species that “I’m aware of”(always questionable) to show such a profile?

Cheers
Thanks KenM. First look I think a Arctic Warbler, and later I found the toe and tarsus is more dark/black than other Arctic Warbler observed local. So confused again.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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