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I think the SACC proposals and associated comments on English names for trogons should be required reading for anyone who thinks that coming up with the perfect (or even passable) English name is an easy task, or that there is always a descriptive solution that works. When I am birding in South America I find that I can ID the trogons easily enough to the level of "oh yeah, it's the one with the fast song" or "it's the green and yellow one that occurs here", but I just find it impossible to remember which name goes with which...

I commented and voted on the Trogon proposals and I agree that the names are a mess, they are impossible to remember (I don’t know anyone who actually remembers all the Trogon names to be honest), and that it’s super hard to come up with good names. I just think that this set of names really should have opted for pragmatism instead of using Graceful and Kerr’s. But at least it includes the Black-throated modifier still. Although it makes for ungainly/long names at least you will know what it is, as Black-throated Trogon was one of the very few that most people didn’t confuse / struggle to remember the name of (probably due to its huge range rather than that itself actually being a good name, hehe).
 
The only hint could be "digiti intermedii"
That means "middle toes", so no.

The size for melanorhynchos (I assume Great Egret), intermedia and melanopus (I assume Little) is mentioned.
Funnily the size of the last one must be wrong, as he notes "This species differs from the most similar Ardea intermedia in the colour of the bill and the size of all parts of its body".
All parts mentioned are smaller than those of intermedia, except the length! Anyway, to me this perfectly explains why he named it "intermedia".
 
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I mean, Intermediate is already kind of a vague descriptor. I am not seeing how that is naturally superior to Plumed or Yellow-billed, other than letting the reader know that the three species are closely related.
Plumed egret is not the only species of egret which has nuptial plumes, yellow-billed egret is not the only species to have a yellow bill.

It's like black-bellied plover v grey plover, all Pluvialis plovers have black bellies in breeding plumage but only one is grey.

The only hint could be "digiti intermedii"
That seems to refer to the middle toe having a length, excluding the nail, of 3''? '' in Imperial measurements means inches, I assume that's not what was meant. Anyway I don't think it explains the name.

David
 
The size for melanorhynchos (I assume Great Egret), intermedia and melanopus (I assume Little) is mentioned.

Funnily the size of the last one must be wrong, as he notes "This species differs from the most similar Ardea intermedia in the colour of the bill and the size of all parts of its body".
All parts mentioned are smaller than those of intermedia, except the length! Anyway, to me this would explain why he named it "intermedia".
 
The size for melanorhynchos (I assume Great Egret), intermedia and melanopus (I assume Little) is mentioned.

Funnily the size of the last one must be wrong, as he notes "This species differs from the most similar Ardea intermedia in the colour of the bill and the size of all parts of its body".
All parts mentioned are smaller than those of intermedia, except the length! Anyway, to me this would explain why he named it "intermedia".
That said, it's better to name it a Intermediate Heron, it's an Ardea after all
 
Sep 30 Post lumps of Siau Pitta and Sangihe Pitta with Sulawesi Pitta.

Sep 30 Post split of monotypic North Papuan Pitta from polytypic (South) Papuan Pitta.
 
Species update mention this:
Pink-breasted Flowerpecker Dicaeum keiense (including fulgidum) is split from Mistletoebird Dicaeum hirundinaceum based on significant differences in morphology (Eaton et al. 2021; HBW/BirdLife; WGAC)
So I presume ignicolle is indeed still grouped with Mistletoebird
 

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