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Latest IOC diary updates (1 Viewer)

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Two more eponyms to bite the dust, I haven't looked in to the reason ........

Jan 31 Change English names of Catharus dryas and C. maculatus.

Gould's (I presume the Shortwing and Gouldian Finch will meet the same fate?) and Sclater's Nightingale Thrushes.

And why are they changing the Diuca Finches? A brief search yielded the fact that Diuca is originally a rural Chilean term for penis?
The SACC (and presumably the NACC) have taken the view that future new bird names should avoid the use of eponyms. As this was a very recent split, both committees seem to be revising the names.

I dont think there is any suggestion (yet) to specifically target Gould or Sclater themselves.

The Diuca Finch situation was simply because White-winged and Common were recently found to be unrelated at roughly the same time that White-winged's unique nesting behaviours came to light. Glacier Finch is a much better name for White-winged.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Two more eponyms to bite the dust, I haven't looked in to the reason ........

Jan 31 Change English names of Catharus dryas and C. maculatus.

Gould's (I presume the Shortwing and Gouldian Finch will meet the same fate?) and Sclater's Nightingale Thrushes.

And why are they changing the Diuca Finches? A brief search yielded the fact that Diuca is originally a rural Chilean term for penis?
Regarding the Catharus, SACC has very recently split these and in that context chosen new names. IOC is just following the lead as far as I can see. https://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop899.htm

For the finches, there is another SACC proposal that passed this January. The White-winged DF was found not to be a sister species of the Diuca finch and therefore that was renamed. Common was no longer needed for the DF. I am assuming (though haven't checked) that IOC follows the changes: https://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop876.htm

Niels
 
Regarding the Catharus, SACC has very recently split these and in that context chosen new names. IOC is just following the lead as far as I can see. https://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop899.htm



Niels

More than just following the lead... Donsker (IOC chair) was first author of the second proposal for renaming these species, after the eponyms used in the Halley et al. 2017 paper were thrown out under the newly invented "must not offend with eponym rules".

So, ..... IOC follows SACCs endorsment of a proposed IOC name. I am sure we could see a lot more of this.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Re the Buzzard, I thought that scientific names could be tweaked but not changed?

Feb 17 Post proposed split of Sulawesi Leaf Warbler. The more widespread form, Phyllosocpus nesophilus, retains the English name of Sulawesi Leaf Warbler. The more restricted range species, Lompobattang Leaf Warbler, takes on the original species epithet, Philosocopus sarasinorum.


Feb 17 Post proposed lump of Alpine Leaf Warbler with Tickell's Leaf Warbler.


Feb 12 Change scientific name of Himalayan Buzzard from Buteo burmanicus to B. refectus.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Feb 12 Change scientific name of Himalayan Buzzard from Buteo burmanicus to B. refectus.
B. refectus has been used all along by Clements and is also the name used by H&M4. I am guessing IOC following along might be due to a rule of using the oldest available scientific name for a given species?

Niels
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Can you explain why this change?
"See Dickinson & Svensson (2012), James (1988) and Dickinson & Remsen (2013)." (https://www.worldbirdnames.org/new/updates/taxonomy/ )

Dickinson & Svensson 2012 : https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267922638
James 1988 : https://repository.naturalis.nl/pub/505223
Dickinson & Remsen 2013 : https://www.aviansystematics.org/4th-edition-checklist?viewfamilies=36

The idea is that refectus applies to the Himalayan population, while burmanicus applies to birds from further N (which are included in japonicus in H&M4).
 

AlexJB497

Member
Feb 17 Post proposed split of Sulawesi Leaf Warbler. The more widespread form, Phyllosocpus nesophilus, retains the English name of Sulawesi Leaf Warbler. The more restricted range species, Lompobattang Leaf Warbler, takes on the original species epithet, Philosocopus sarasinorum.
Some new genera being created here! :ROFLMAO:
 

MJB

Well-known member
So japonicus would contain 4 subspecies or burmanicus is included in nominate japonicus ?
As I'm given to understand, the type of burmanicus (collected in Burma) is attributable to the form of B. japonicus that breeds in NE Asia and regularly migrates to S and SE Asia, & is considered a subspecies of B. japonicus (Temminck & Schlegel 1845) as per Lindholm & Forsten 2013: other authorities subsume burmanicus in japonicus: H&M4 Online now revise distribution to include burmanicus breeding distribution under B. japonicus.
 

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