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Leica Pocket like all purpose bino? (1 Viewer)

pluton

Well-known member
Hello,
My questions is if the Leica Pocket model, one Trino/Ultravid 8x20-10x25 can be a good all purpose binocular in tiny formar, a really pocket binocular but with a good usability optical and mechanical.
Best,
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
My 8x20 Trinovids are by far my most used binocular. I will stick them in my pocket on most trips out even if I am just going to the shops. Are they an all round binocular, certainly not. The eye placement can be tricky and being only 20mm they need fairly bright conditions. But they are certainly better than leaving your your binoculars at home because they are too cumbersome.
 

pm42

Well-known member
Hello,
My questions is if the Leica Pocket model, one Trino/Ultravid 8x20-10x25 can be a good all purpose binocular in tiny formar, a really pocket binocular but with a good usability optical and mechanical.
I've used a Trinovid 8x20 for decades and upgraded it to the Ultravid. They are very nice but each time I was sure I would be using a bino, I took my 8x32 because the general comfort and field of view were so much better.
If I wanted a compact bino as my main one, it would be the Zeiss Victory 8x25: slightly bigger than the Leica 8x20 but still small enough to fit into a pocket or be forgotten inside a bag but easier to use.
 
Hello,

I use the Leica UV 8 x 20 BR as my only daylight binocular, even though I fully concede that a larger, 8 x 32 format is more comfortable to use. For me it was just a question of getting used to it. The optics are phenomenal and the very low weight allows me to carry it pretty much everywhere. I think 8 x 20 is more versatile than the 10 x 25 because it's smaller, has a wider field of view and much better close focus. For low light work or for astronomy, I choose larger formats. Horses for courses, as it were.

Dipper D.
 

eitanaltman

Well-known member
No. Not if you are a serious binocular user (vs an occasional “glancer”).

No 8x20 or 10x25 is a going to be a good “one and only” binocular option. The tiny size and 2.5mm exit pupil are too limiting. You can’t do serious birding with finicky eye placement.

Agree with the above that a 8x25 like the Zeiss VP is a better choice if you have to go the compact route. Much bigger FOV, and better handling because of the extra size and larger exit pupil.
 
Like I said, it's a question of what you're used to. I'm not a novice user and I do consider myself a serious and regular glasser. I just like using the 8x 20 for all of my daylight viewing. Indeed I downsized from a 8 x 32 Trinovid to acquire the 8x 20 UV.
 

jafritten

Well-known member
Hello,
My questions is if the Leica Pocket model, one Trino/Ultravid 8x20-10x25 can be a good all purpose binocular in tiny formar, a really pocket binocular but with a good usability optical and mechanical.
Best,
Yes, it can - unless you rate the advantages of a large exit pupil and a wide field of view higher than compactness. Optical and mechanical quality is great. I can second what Mono and Dipperdapper say about the Leicas. There are some drawbacks, though. See Eitan's post #6.
 

Mike F

Well-known member
Best the 8x20 than the 10x25 model for multi purpose..?
I think it just depends on your preference and what you want from a binocular. The 8x is a bit smaller, but the 10x (particularly the BCA) is still extremely compact. Given that the exit pupil is the same in both I think the advantages of greater detail retrieval (which is what I generally use binoculars for - most of the time I couldn't care less about FOV) of the 10x outweigh any advantage of the 8x. And of course these tiny bins can be good all purpose binoculars - just don't expect much if you want to go birdwatching at dusk.......
 

tpcollins

Well-known member
I have the 8x20 Ultravid BR and they are great. I use them for turkey hunting and early season bowhunting (sorry, I’m a hunter).

I used to have the 8x20 Trinovids but the eye relief didn’t work for me as an eyeglass wearer. The Ultravids work great.
 

lmans66

Out Birding....
Supporter
United States
I just opted for the 8x20 Mono instead of the bin. Same Ultravid quality, just half. I figured that lightness and size were my main reasons and to get a bin that even doubles the size (that makes it sound huge!), wasn't worth it. Just small hikes with the wife, bike rides, trips in non covid times, etc. But in either case (bin or mono), you have a winner
 

John Frink

Well-known member
No. Not if you are a serious binocular user (vs an occasional “glancer”).

No 8x20 or 10x25 is a going to be a good “one and only” binocular option. The tiny size and 2.5mm exit pupil are too limiting. You can’t do serious birding with finicky eye placement.
I respectfully disagree. When I was young and my eyesight was better, I spent several years in a "minimalist" phase, where I did serious birding carrying only a Zeiss Classic 10x25 binocular; no field guide, no electronics, no scope, nothing else. It did require some effort and practice to get to where I could use that little bino effectively, but one of the benefits I discovered was that the limitations of my equipment meant I had to become more alert and more aware of my surroundings; I had to become a better observer. I became a better birder because of, not in spite of, the limitations of my equipment. It was great fun, and I highly recommend this approach to anyone who enjoys a challenge and would like to become a better outdoor observer.

John
 

dorubird

Well-known member
Romania
1. I personally like more 10x25 than 8x20 thanks to 5mm more aperture and 2x more power!
2. But I like 8x20 more than 10x25 thanks to his much more compact shape!
3. I like both! But if I were forced to choose only one I think I would choose Trinovid 10x25 because I am used to using such a small 10x binoculars.
here is a comparison with my trinovids:
 

Mike F

Well-known member
1. I personally like more 10x25 than 8x20 thanks to 5mm more aperture and 2x more power!
2. But I like 8x20 more than 10x25 thanks to his much more compact shape!
3. I like both! But if I were forced to choose only one I think I would choose Trinovid 10x25 because I am used to using such a small 10x binoculars.
here is a comparison with my trinovids:
I also have the 10x25 Trinovid and prefer that to the 8x20 for its extra magnification in such a small package, but I don’t think there is any advantage in the extra 5 mm objective lens because the EP is the same as the 8x20, and that’s what really matters.
 

CSG

Well-known member
United States
I can't speak specifically to Leica's versions of these small bins though I rejected a pair some years back in favor of the Zeiss Victory 10x25's. I also have an ancient pair of Minolta 6x20 porros that I bought my grandfather back in the early 80's but received back after he passed. He liked having the convenience of small bins so you always had something you could easily take for travel and walks but, for me, 8x32 is my idea of an all-arounder even though I've carried my Zeiss 10x25's far more often on walks and hikes. Then again, my interest is not primarily birding, it's more being able to look ar a wide variety of things, including terrain ahead. The reason I bought the 10x25 instead of the more compact 8x20 Zeiss was that I was doing SAR at the time and the bit of extra reach in our wide open spaces was considered more useful even with the narrower FOV. But when the light got low, as good as the coatings on these are, they weren't the best choice. However, they were always in my pocket.
 

dorubird

Well-known member
Romania

Mike F

I have both variants of Trinovid, and the difference of 5mm in apertures between 25mm and 20mm is visible, but only in difficult lighting conditions. This is another advantage of 10x25 over 8x20- but 25mm bino they're not dim light conditions binoculars anyway. Having the same exit pupil, I agree that only in bright sunlight they are similar!
 
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Mike F

Well-known member
@CSG, yes, they’re not bright bins, although more than bright enough in good light. A few years ago when I only had the 10x25 Trinovids I bought a Nikon 7x50 marine binocular for use on a boat. I remember the first time that I compared their low light performance. I was using the 10x25‘s one evening as it was getting dark (from land). It got to the point where to the naked eye the trees on the shore across the lake just looked black and I could just about make out some detail with the binoculars. Then I switched to the 7x50’s and suddenly the distant shore looked very light (really) and I could make out all the details of the trees with no problem at all. Much brighter than the view with the naked eye. That’s when I really appreciated what large objectives and large EP’s can do!
 

fazalmajid

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
No, they will do in a pinch but the smallest binoculars I would consider for extended use are the Zeiss Victory Pocket 8x25. I have both the Trinovid and Ultravid 8x20, BTW. The compact binoculars are just too finicky in eye placement for comfortable extended use and the baseline for serious binoculars remains 32 or 42mm objectives. For nearly the same price as Ultravid 8x20 you can get Nikon's excellent Monarch HG 8x42 that are much more sensible as primary binoculars.
 

CSG

Well-known member
United States
@CSG, yes, they’re not bright bins, although more than bright enough in good light. A few years ago when I only had the 10x25 Trinovids I bought a Nikon 7x50 marine binocular for use on a boat. I remember the first time that I compared their low light performance. I was using the 10x25‘s one evening as it was getting dark (from land). It got to the point where to the naked eye the trees on the shore across the lake just looked black and I could just about make out some detail with the binoculars. Then I switched to the 7x50’s and suddenly the distant shore looked very light (really) and I could make out all the details of the trees with no problem at all. Much brighter than the view with the naked eye. That’s when I really appreciated what large objectives and large EP’s can do!
Yup, and that's why I have too many binoculars! ;)
 

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