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Leica retrovid 7x35 viable for use through British winter? (1 Viewer)

Boogieshrew

Well-known member
Hi everyone,
I've been reading with appreciation all the great info you have written about these bins but there's one question I haven't spotted an answer to.

Is the Leica retrovid 7x35 viable for use as my only bins through British winter?

I use mainly Ultravid plus 7x42s year round but really appreciate them in the cold wet dark days of UK winter.
But my ailing shoulders/neck/back can't take their weight any more, even on a harness. I will really miss them when I give them up.

So I wonder if the Retrovids are weather sealed enough to make it through winter here.

I don't bird in the rain because I wear glasses but I do occasionally get caught out in a heavy shower. I can always put the bins in a pocket of case when that happens.

Will the focusser stiffen up in the cold do you know?
Will they suffer internal condensation?

What do you reckon?

All the best
 

gweller

Well-known member
I love mine, it's a very nice binocular, but I do tend to baby it a bit!! So I doubt I will be using it in the winter to be honest, but will switch back to using my Swaro 8x30 CL

According to Leica they are not waterproof, but are shower proof. This seems to be supported by the fact that Leica include a rain guard in the accessories. I don't think internal condensation would be a problem as they are very well built and seem adequately sealed to me. I can't say whether the focuser stiffens in the cold as I have not had mine long enough to try them in cold/freezing weather, but I don't expect that to be an issue to be honest. Personally I would just carry a large ziplock freezer bag with me and pop them in there if the weather turns too inclement.

One thing that might be and issue is that they will probably feel very cold to the touch as opposed to you Ultravid, due to the lack of rubber armour. I remember I used to get freezing cold hands when using an unarmoured Nikon 8x30 EII during the winter, and I expect the same will be the case with the Retrovid.
 

Boogieshrew

Well-known member
Hi gweller,
thanks for your reply.
That's a good point that hadn't occurred to me that they will be a cold lump of metal in the winter. I will have to make sure I have some quality gloves.
Unless it's really freezing, I usually wear only thin liner gloves so as to retain a good grip on my bins but something thicker will be necessary for the Retrovids I think.
 

jan van daalen

Well-known member
Given the fact that I am a 7x addict, I use the Retro under all circumstances and so far it hasn't shown any mail functioning what so ever. It has seen severe heat, rain and cold and the only wear and tear is on the blackened alu tubes.
Considering my history with Leica I tend to abuse it a little bit (it bumps up and down in my Landrover Defender) but it holds its fort.
Jan
 

Mike F

Well-known member
@Jan, I’m always impressed by the fact that even though you have every reason to slate Leica, you simply can’t because of the quality (of the 7x35’s at least). It speaks volumes! πŸ˜‰
 

Boogieshrew

Well-known member
Given the fact that I am a 7x addict, I use the Retro under all circumstances and so far it hasn't shown any mail functioning what so ever. It has seen severe heat, rain and cold and the only wear and tear is on the blackened alu tubes.
Considering my history with Leica I tend to abuse it a little bit (it bumps up and down in my Landrover Defender) but it holds its fort.
Jan
Thank you Jan, that's excellent to know.
You have made my mind up for me.
The retrovid is for me!
Marvellous!
 

Boogieshrew

Well-known member
Well, she has always been treated nice, has been owned by a old man and has only be used indoors and for that reason she is in a mint condition........
Treat her well.

Jan
Thank you Jan. You are a very generous person indeed.
I can't promise they will only be used indoors but I will do more than treat them nice, I will treasure them.
I wil let everyone here know how I get on with them.
Thanks again from quite possibly the happiest man on BF at the moment
😁
 

ZDHart

Well-known member
Supporter
Such a generous offer! Congrats Boogie!

But Jan... what bins will ride in your Land Rover Defender now? (Not that you would have any shortage of options!)

Wasn't the Defender Prince Phillip's favorite vehicle?
 

jan van daalen

Well-known member
Such a generous offer! Congrats Boogie!

But Jan... what bins will ride in your Land Rover Defender now? (Not that you would have any shortage of options!)

Wasn't the Defender Prince Phillip's favorite vehicle?
LOL, I'll find something.

Defenders (Landrover in common) are famous/notorious about their performance. Will or won't it start........
I suspect Prince Phillip did his last trick when he choose that car.
Just imagine..... it didn't start. He would have laughed in his coffin laying comfortable and enjoying the panic around him........ "F..ck, it won't start. We'll be late at the funeral. The whole world is watching us". And him thinking "guys relax, I'm in no rush".

Jan
 
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Binastro

Well-known member
I was going to say Wow, but I thought I'd better hold back for a while at such a generous offer.

A 1950s Land Rover probably saved my garage supervisor and me from serious injury.

I spent the winter of 1963/4 pulling cars out of snow drifts in the north of England. Using the low ratio.

With Billy Royal in the cab in the main large avenue, a small post office van did a suicidal u-turn just as I was about to pass him. I would probably have killed him.
But I had very fast young reflexes and I pulled violently off the road between the large trees lining the road onto the pavement, then back onto the road. With a normal car this would have been difficult, but no problem for the Land Rover.

I said "Billy I can't drive anymore, will you please drive". I was in shock.
But he said "No, you drive, you will be O.K."
After he told the boss of my escape, I was allowed to drive the Rolls Royce when I wanted as I had passed the driving test to their satisfaction.

I never got to drive the Aston Martin DB4. A lovely car.

The Land Rover always started, but it belonged to the garage.
It was painted bright yellow.

B.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Hi Jan,

I had to look it up.
Good fun.

Actually, I found Ford electrics to be worse.

And the AA man told me the most common cars that had to be put on his trailer were BMWs.

But the British cars we had were awful.
The engine of our Maxi fell out.
The Minis lasted a year.
The brakes on our Austins lousy.
My Austin 1800 was starved of oil cornering fast and needed new pistons.

So we changed to Saab and after 400,000 km each they are still fine.

A great thing you did with the 7x35 Leica.

Best regards,
B.
 

Boogieshrew

Well-known member
A great thing you did with the 7x35 Leica.
Several times today I have caught myself thinking "why am I so happy back at work on an overcast Monday? (not the best day of the week after all) and then thinking "oh yes Leica 7x35s, oh yeah!"

A great thing indeed to remove the Monday morning gloom πŸ˜ƒ
 

Mike F

Well-known member
I just checked my callander to make sure that it’s not the first of April. Given that we’re a safe distance from that date I wondered, @jan van daalen whether you happened to have some 10x50 UVHD+ hanging around that you think would deserve an appreciative new owner? πŸ˜‰πŸ˜€
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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