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Leica Trinovid HD 8x32 (1 Viewer)

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
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Here are some impressions of Leica's new Trinnie 8x32.

In the hand it feels very nicely finished indeed and feels well balanced. The eyecups offer a lot of adjustment and one notch up from fully down was perfect for me wearing spectacles. Me and Troubadoris tried them out over a couple of days in Suffolk and while we didn't have other models to compare them with we came to the conclusion that the colour balance was halfway between traditional Leica and Zeiss so not quite as warm as Leica's usual. It is a nice balance. I wouldn't say they are sharper than Zeiss's Conquest HD but they have a little more contrast. The current obsession on this forum is glare but we had overcast skies for much of the time and I can't say they ever got a proper glare test. I never saw any chromatic aberration but again I didn't get a highly contrasting view to test it out properly.

Close focus is brilliant at a bit less than 1 metre and before anyone says that is excessively close, here is why it is great. We find we often come quietly around some type of cover/corner, it might be a rock or a bush or anything and find ourselves close to some unsuspecting critter. It might be a snake or lizard or butterfly or dragonfly or whatever and if you need to step back because your binos don't focus close enough you almost always scare the critter off when you do so. With the Leicas this won't happen so we consider them great general purpose nature observation glasses.

Grumbles? Yes some minor ones: they come with a bag not a case and it won't accept the binos with neckstrap and/or rainguard attached, the rainguard cups need to have a little larger internal diameter because if you fit the guard firmly to the eyecups its difficult to remove quickly. OK you can learn how to not put it on so firmly but when out in the rain you need a rainguard that goes on and comes off instinctively and without the need to think about it. Finally the strap ends are narrower than usual and one of them slipped undone from the clip. This could have been due to my habit of resting my right hand in readiness on my bins all the time we are walking but I have been doing this for 45 years and it never happened before. It didn't happen to Troubadoris by the way.

So are the Trinovids a worthy addition to the Leica family? Yes, but for the mid-life facelift the accessories would benefit from a little tweaking.

Lee
 
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Dr Owl

Dude ... and proud of it
Thanks for the review, Lee.

When you were using the Trinovid, did you notice how much turning it took to change the focus from close up to infinity?

John
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Thanks for the review, Lee.

When you were using the Trinovid, did you notice how much turning it took to change the focus from close up to infinity?

John

Hi John

I did the next best thing which is to assess the number of turns from focused on a farm building 2.5 miles / 4km away to a point 2 metres away. Apart from astronomical use I think this pretty much covers the working distance of most binos and the Trinovid took 0.85 turns.

This means it is significantly faster than an HT 8x42 (1.2 turns) or SF 8x42 (1.0 turn) but not as fast as Kowa Genesis 8x33 (0.75 turns) or Conquest HD 8x32 at 0.5 turns.

Hope this helps.

Lee
 

Dr Owl

Dude ... and proud of it
Thank you once again, Lee. That was exactly what I hoped to learn.

It all contributes to my on-off quest for the perfect bird-and-butterfly bins ... which is hindered on the one hand by dreams of a four-inch refractor, and on the other by the Pussycat's belief that I already have enough optics. |=(|

John
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Thank you once again, Lee. That was exactly what I hoped to learn.

It all contributes to my on-off quest for the perfect bird-and-butterfly bins ... which is hindered on the one hand by dreams of a four-inch refractor, and on the other by the Pussycat's belief that I already have enough optics. |=(|

John

4" refractors tend to scare off butterflies and dragonflies so I think you should stick to the binos idea.

Lee
 

Hermann

Well-known member
Lee:

Interesting posting. A shame you didn't have the Conquest HD for comparison, but a slightly slower focuser sounds good. Seems to me you liked the Leica.

As to the "obsession with glare" - well, glare is definitely one of the remaining problems quite a few binoculars have. And veiling glare can make the difference between getting an ID or not.

Hermann
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
The close focus sounds lovely for bugs and herps. How did you feel about the FOV? As I recall it is fairly restricted?
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Lee:

Interesting posting. A shame you didn't have the Conquest HD for comparison, but a slightly slower focuser sounds good. Seems to me you liked the Leica.

As to the "obsession with glare" - well, glare is definitely one of the remaining problems quite a few binoculars have. And veiling glare can make the difference between getting an ID or not.

Hermann

Hermann

The focus speed is a nice balance, and yes, I agree glare is important. I suppose I should have said glare is the fashionable issue on BF just recently meaning one most often discussed. Obsession was perhaps the wrong word.

Lee
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
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The close focus sounds lovely for bugs and herps. How did you feel about the FOV? As I recall it is fairly restricted?

I doesn't feel restricted at all. I have done some comparisons with bins having wider published FOVs and I am tempted to conclude the Leica has more FOV than they claim. BUT, I haven't done this seriously enough to come to a definite conclusion yet.

Lee
 

Vespobuteo

Well-known member
Mr T, I think you were pretty kind to Lei-CA this time...if you know what I mean...;)

Would you swap your beloved Conquest HD for the Trinovid HD (if zero cost)?
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Mr T, I think you were pretty kind to Lei-CA this time...if you know what I mean...;)

Would you swap your beloved Conquest HD for the Trinovid HD (if zero cost)?

That is a very hard question to answer:

I use Conquest in habitats where fast-moving, very close subjects are encountered, as well as distant birds so here are the differences:

Conquest HD has a faster focus and that can mean the difference between getting a look at a subject or missing it.

Trinovid has a closer focus, so when moving quietly and slowly when you find yourself close to a butterfly, dragonfly or hoverfly etc, you rarely have to step back to use your binos and by doing this scare the subject away.

On balance I wouldn't swap Conquest for Trinovid and since Conquest comes with a genuine carry-case and is at a lower price, it is better value.

But anyone might prefer the view through the Trinnie it having a little stronger red and a little more contrast and an ultimately closer focus.

Lee
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Thanks Lee, would be curious to see a measured FOV. Looks like a very, very nice bin but, at least on paper, with a frustratingly small FOV relative to a lot of the competition...
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Thanks Lee, would be curious to see a measured FOV. Looks like a very, very nice bin but, at least on paper, with a frustratingly small FOV relative to a lot of the competition...

Yes I agree. A quick comparison suggested Trinovid has more fov than the specs suggest but I haven't had the opportunity to do proper comparison.

I have several major household jobs and Bird Fair looming with a holiday on North Uist looming up soon after. I plan to take Trinnie and some 32s on holiday and do better comparisons then.

Lee
 

Vespobuteo

Well-known member
That is a very hard question to answer:

I use Conquest in habitats where fast-moving, very close subjects are encountered, as well as distant birds so here are the differences:

Conquest HD has a faster focus and that can mean the difference between getting a look at a subject or missing it.

Trinovid has a closer focus, so when moving quietly and slowly when you find yourself close to a butterfly, dragonfly or hoverfly etc, you rarely have to step back to use your binos and by doing this scare the subject away.

On balance I wouldn't swap Conquest for Trinovid and since Conquest comes with a genuine carry-case and is at a lower price, it is better value.

But anyone might prefer the view through the Trinnie it having a little stronger red and a little more contrast and an ultimately closer focus.

Lee

I'm pretty slow so I think I would go for the Trinovid (if I was forced to pick one). Contrast was nice, and the feel is a bit more stylish than the Conquests. Much prefer the UV HD+ overall though. If you already gonna spend, why not spend some more...:)

Any plans on reviewing the Ultravid HD+?
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
The close focus definitely makes these appealing for bug+bird use, but the minimum IPD spec of 58 mm is disappointing for anyone with smaller IPD and it compromises close use for anyone who is already at or close to that limit at infinity. By comparison, Zeiss Conquest gets down to 54 mm and Zeiss FL gets all the way to 52 mm.

--AP
 

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