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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Life lists: (1 Viewer)

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Why wouldn't you? They're wild birds

I was always told that you had to be there at the moment of release to count them on your Brit list?

I know that long time, number one, World lister, John Hornbuckle, now sadly deceased, often carried mist nets on his travels.
 
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Mike C

Emeritus President at Burnage Rugby Club
I don't know if it's a rule, and if it is who is monitoring that rule but I was told by my mentor when I first started birding that you couldn't tick the bird in the net or in the ringer's hand.
The caveat being - it's your list - you count what you want to count.
 

WACCOE

Marching on Together
Why not is it any different from tape luring birds in which you would ave little or no chance of seeing or putting out food to attract birds.
 

temmie

Well-known member
No you can't.

You can count wild birds that are free to go / free to hide / free to fly away or come closer. Not birds in captivity.

Mist-netted birds are countable in most countries 24 hours (or one night in between) after they have been released.
 

YuShan

hikingbirdman.com
United Kingdom
I wouldn't count any trapped animals. That includes birds in mist-nets.

I also think that making that socially (ethically) acceptable would lead to very undesirable behaviour. Just imagine birders setting up mist-nets or other trapping devies to capture rare birds just to tick them off on their life-list!
 
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Steve Lister

Senior Birder, ex County Recorder, Garden Moths.
United Kingdom
The only written guidance I can recollect ever seeing about this was I think in the ABA advice to members who submit lists to them. And I think it was something along the lines of the bird is countable once it has started behaving naturally after release.

I don't think it is right to tick a bird while it is actually in captivity. Otherwise zoos would be a lot more popular.

Steve
 

SlowLowFlyingTurkey

Well-known member
I wouldn't count it while in the net or the captor's hand, but the moment it is released I would count it as a free-flying bird again. In other words, I would have to be there to witness the release.

On a similar note, I would have no problem counting a wild bird that had become temporarily trapped, for example flown through a window and having difficulty escaping the building, as long as the bird genuinely entered the building of it's own free will and there was no deliberate attempt to lure it in. So far I haven't yet had to tick anything under these circumstances though.
 

ambduck5

Active member
Is there any difference between birds in the hand or just released and strand line corpses, shot birds or road casualties. In fact, take it to the next level and we can all visit the local museum and tick off 'collected' specimens from earlier centuries. I personally believe you have to be pretty desperate to 'tick' anything before, after or subsequent to ringing.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
I personally believe there are far too many people trying to make the difficult business of twitching more difficult at the moment. Despite being generally pro-European I don't care how long other countries make people wait before a mist-netted bird becomes tickable again.

SOP in Britain is that a trapped bird is tickable on release. Anyone who doesn't want to tick such birds doesn't have to, but stop trying to back-seat drive others' lists: and for that matter stop trying to take one more bit of joy out of what is, after all, a hobby, you miserable lot. Shame on all of you: why can't you say something decent - and righteous - and above all, positive, for once?

John
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
I personally believe there are far too many people trying to make the difficult business of twitching more difficult at the moment. Despite being generally pro-European I don't care how long other countries make people wait before a mist-netted bird becomes tickable again.

SOP in Britain is that a trapped bird is tickable on release. Anyone who doesn't want to tick such birds doesn't have to, but stop trying to back-seat drive others' lists: and for that matter stop trying to take one more bit of joy out of what is, after all, a hobby, you miserable lot. Shame on all of you: why can't you say something decent - and righteous - and above all, positive, for once?

John

As I said.
 

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
I personally believe there are far too many people trying to make the difficult business of twitching more difficult at the moment. Despite being generally pro-European I don't care how long other countries make people wait before a mist-netted bird becomes tickable again.

SOP in Britain is that a trapped bird is tickable on release. Anyone who doesn't want to tick such birds doesn't have to, but stop trying to back-seat drive others' lists: and for that matter stop trying to take one more bit of joy out of what is, after all, a hobby, you miserable lot. Shame on all of you: why can't you say something decent - and righteous - and above all, positive, for once?

John

Well put John
 

birdboybowley

Well-known member.....apparently so ;)
Supporter
England
Is there any difference between birds in the hand or just released and strand line corpses, shot birds or road casualties. In fact, take it to the next level and we can all visit the local museum and tick off 'collected' specimens from earlier centuries. I personally believe you have to be pretty desperate to 'tick' anything before, after or subsequent to ringing.

What a weird tangent that is.....
 

Mike C

Emeritus President at Burnage Rugby Club
Is there any difference between birds in the hand or just released and strand line corpses, shot birds or road casualties. In fact, take it to the next level and we can all visit the local museum and tick off 'collected' specimens from earlier centuries. I personally believe you have to be pretty desperate to 'tick' anything before, after or subsequent to ringing.

So a Yellow-billed Cuckoo is ringed (banded) in the nest.
Flies to the UK

You won't tick it ?
 

Sangahyando

Well-known member
I personally believe you have to be pretty desperate to 'tick' anything before, after or subsequent to ringing.
How do you know a bird you see has never been handled before? Rings aren't always visible on a bird in the field, and any bird might have been picked up by a human at some point, for instance if it was saved from a sticky situation, maybe even treated in a rehabilitation facility.
Might as well not tick any bird if that's your position.

FWIW, my life list looks the same with or without birds seen during or after ringing.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
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