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Lineated Woodcreeper (1 Viewer)

lewis20126

Well-known member
A valid point that I've mentioned elsewhere several times before. In particular, frequent wholesale generic reassignments (and to a lesser extent grammatical tweaks and retrospective spelling corrections) are great fun for us taxonomy addicts, but the result is an absence of of commonality and stability in the scientific names used by different authorities and authors. Sadly, I have to agree with Morgan that, despite the sometimes unnecessarily trivial bickering, for ordinary birders common names often provide a rare strand of continuity amid the turmoil of increasingly ephemeral scientific binomials.

I suspect the rare strand of continuity provided by English names is not only of use to ordinary birders! Until there is a period of stability in generic assignments, how can anyone, for example checklist authors, ever hope to select the "correct" scientific name (ie the one which will endure). A Saunder's Gull will always be a Saunder's Gull but I wouldn't put a pound (Euro, dollar) on the name Chroicocephalus saundersi seeing out the decade..

cheers, alan
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
A Saunder's Gull will always be a Saunder's Gull but I wouldn't put a pound (Euro, dollar) on the name Chroicocephalus saundersi seeing out the decade..
A good example, Alan. (Although it's usually Saunders's Gull. ;))
  • Larus: HBW3 1996 ("sometimes placed in monotypic subgenus Saundersia"), HBW Alive, Malling Olsen & Larsson 2003/2004, OSJ 2012

  • Chroicocephalus: IOC, Zoonomen, CBR 2013, BirdsKorea 2014

  • Saundersilarus: eBird/Clements, TiF, Brazil 2009, H&M4 2013, HBW/BirdLife 2014
 

lewis20126

Well-known member
A good example, Alan. (Although it's usually Saunders's Gull. ;))

I'm a specialist in apostrophe errors although it rather goes to prove the point that you knew the bird I meant! ;) Chroicocephalus probably means almost nothing to anyone - even most taxonomists.

cheers, alan
 

Birdspotter

Well-known member
Can anyone tell me which one (or more) of the four new species can be found in Ecuador?
I have been trying to look for range maps for all four species in order to update my Bubo list but no joy so far.

cheers

Calum
 

Ian David Ellis

Active member

"XC’s taxonomy follows that of the IOC, which does not split Lepidocolaptes albolineatus.....it would therefore seem sensible for XC to align its taxonomy now with the SACC by elevating the five subspecies of L. albolineatus currently recognized by XC to species status. If this departure from IOC taxonomy is not acceptable, XC should treat the five species recognized by the SACC as subspecies of L. albolineatus."

I thought that IOC accepted the split in v4.3 (July 2014)?
 

recbirds

Active member
....it is just that xeno-canto has not updated it's taxonomy and is currently using IOC v4.1 (January 2014).
 

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