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Links to digitized versions of original sources of bird names (1 Viewer)

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Is Siebold's Fauna Japonica (1850) available online please? Contains e.g. Carbo capillatus Temminck & Schlegel, 1850.
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Neumann, O. (1934). Drei neue geographische Rassen ans dem paläarktischen Gebiet. Ornithologischer Anzeiger 2 (8): 331-334. Available anywhere online please? Not on BHL as not out of copyright yet; not on Ornithologischer Anzeiger's website either.

Includes description of Thalasseus bengalensis emigratus.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Neumann, O. (1934). Drei neue geographische Rassen ans dem paläarktischen Gebiet. Ornithologischer Anzeiger 2 (8): 331-334.
Can't help with this one. As you say it's still under copyright, thus the only place where you should really expect it is on the journal website. (Or in Google Books, but then in snippet view only).
(Of course, even if the paper is so cited at several places on the Web, it's not "ans", but "aus dem paläarktischen Gebiet". The journal was called Anzeiger der Ornithologischen Gesellschaft in Bayern back then.)
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Thanks!

I'd guess the 'ans' is an OCR error; it is in the journal's website index of past issues (here; where I copied the title from). Annoyingly they don't even give an abstract, let alone a copy of the article.
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Zoothera aurea on p. 60 of Holandre, Annuaire de la Moselle (1825) - not on BHL, nor google books that I can find.

As an aside, did find links for its synonyms Turdus varius Pallas, 1831 (and Hartert's note about the name change to aurea) and Turdus whitei Eyton, 1836.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Zoothera aurea on p. 60 of Holandre, Annuaire de la Moselle (1825) - not on BHL, nor google books that I can find.
I don't find it either. But, if you need something, you can perhaps point to Fournel 1836 [here], who quoted the 1825 description verbatim.


(The actual ref to this work seems to be:
Holandre JJJ. 1825. Faune du département de la Moselle, et principalement des environs de Metz, ou tableau des animaux que l'on y rencontre naturellement, avec diverses indications sur leur rareté, sur les lieux et les époques de leur apparition. Partie ornithologique. Verronais, Metz, 48 pp.​
E.g., see contemporaneous publication report [here]. This was followed by a second part (next year, 1826), covering mammals, reptiles and fish; publication reported [here].
Holandre also published a more extensive work a decade later:
Holandre JJJ. 1836. Faune du département de la Moselle. Animaux vertébrés. Mammifères, oiseaux, reptiles et poissons. Mme Thiel, Metz.​
[pdf here]. Turdus aureus is described there as well, with "Faune de la Moselle 1825." as the authority; the description is on p.60 (which -- by coincidence...? I'd really be curious to see the 1825 original, actually -- is the page number cited by Hartert for the 1825 OD).)


Beware that Hartert's 1910 BB discussion is outdated.

The date of the publication of Pallas' Zoographia Rosso-Asiatica has been a matter of contention. Except for the plates, the first two volumes of the work (which include birds) were printed in 1811, just after Pallas' death; but Pallas apparently wanted his plates to be engraved by a particular German engraver and no-one else, and the Academy of St Petersburg tried to have this wish fulfilled. As a result, (very) few exemplars were distributed at this time; the bulk of the distribution occurred much later (and with many/most plates still lacking). During the whole 1811-1831 period, some zoologists were aware of the work and accepted the names that appear in it, others were not and named the species that Pallas had described anew. Thus a fair number of species have a name by Pallas, and another one by someone else, which precedence relative to the name proposed by Pallas depended on the exact date of publication that was accepted for the Zoographia. To put an end to these debates, the publication date of the two first volumes was fixed as 1811 (and that of the third volume as 1814) in Opinion 212 of the ICZN (issued in 1954 -- obviously Hartert in 1910 could not have known this): this is the date to be adopted for Turdus varius Pallas, which makes it senior to Turdus aureus Holandre 1825.

We did not revert to using Turdus varius Pallas 1811, because this name is a junior primary homonym of Turdus varius Vieillot 1803 [OD], and therefore permanently invalid. (Some Russian authors did revert recently, though, and are now using Zoothera varia.)
 
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Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Excellent as usual, thanks! If the original is only 48 pages and very hard to find original copies of, it does rather hint that the "p. 60" is derived from the Fournel 1836 text.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Turdus aureus

Maybe someting is helped by this (from 1828), here, pp.239-240, or here (top of page) ... ?

That is if you know French, of course. ;)

Björn

PS. Did you noticed that the Fournel 1836 edition, on BHL, here, was scanned as lately as 09/15/2016!

PPS. The Original 1825 Edition is For Sale, here, for a good prize.
--
 
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Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Pallas, Reise durch verschiedene Provinzen des Russischen Reichs Vol. 3 (Motacilla montanella supposedly page 695, but the only copy I could find online doesn't have 695 pages). Surprisingly for such an important work, BHL doesn't have it (not any of the volumes).
 

l_raty

laurent raty
What you found on the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek website is not the actual thing -- it is the zweyter Band of something titled Medecinisch-practische Bibliothek, which includes a chapter that is about Pallas' work. The scanned book on the SUB Göttingen website are generally best reached via [AnimalBase].

It's also in Google [here], but a bit hard to find. (The dritter Theil is made of two books; here, the second book stands under its own title which is not that of the whole work; the first book is [here].)
 

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