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Looking for a spotting scope -UK (1 Viewer)

Robinroe

Member
United Kingdom
Hi all , I am new to the forum and relatively new to birding.
Are there any decent spotting scopes available for five hundred pounds maximum? I am unable to spend any more than that and was shocked at the prices I have seen. I am also confused with all the jargon involved and don't want to waste money on something that isn't suitable. I would rather not have one ( that's a lie, more like can't afford one) if I have to spend thousands of pounds. I appreciate you get what you pay for but any suggestions would be gratefully received.
Thanks
 

Mike C

Emeritus President at Burnage Rugby Club
Supporter
England
Don’t know where you live but you are more than likely within an hours drive of a reputable optics shop.
You have a budget and give the likes of Opticron and Hawke, they have excellent quality stuff which will fit your budget.
If you see something you like you should be able to try before you buy.

An optics shop might also have absolute top quality ‘scopes which they received as trade-ins at your price point

Good Luck
 

dwatsonbirder

Well-known member
A good scope for £500 or less? Easy-peasy.

You may be a little limited for new options, but with that budget you can get an absolutely top draw used scope.
Here are some well worth checking out, all are within (or under) budget, and will transform your birding, providing excellent views:

Used Opticron MM3 50 ED Spotting Scope - Angled - 7590 / 6 Months Warranty / Clifton Cameras (will require an eyepiece)

The main considerations are size and weight (if you are static, then bigger is better) and straight or angled. The one bit of advice is to try before you buy where possible...
Good luck!
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I'm just going to jump in here and wish you a warm welcome from those of us on staff here at BirdForum (y)
We're glad you found us and please join in wherever you like ;)
 

Robinroe

Member
United Kingdom
Don’t know where you live but you are more than likely within an hours drive of a reputable optics shop.
You have a budget and give the likes of Opticron and Hawke, they have excellent quality stuff which will fit your budget.
If you see something you like you should be able to try before you buy.

An optics shop might also have absolute top quality ‘scopes which they received as trade-ins at your price point

Good Luck
Thank you very much, I will certainly have a look
 

Robinroe

Member
United Kingdom
A good scope for £500 or less? Easy-peasy.

You may be a little limited for new options, but with that budget you can get an absolutely top draw used scope.
Here are some well worth checking out, all are within (or under) budget, and will transform your birding, providing excellent views:

Used Opticron MM3 50 ED Spotting Scope - Angled - 7590 / 6 Months Warranty / Clifton Cameras (will require an eyepiece)

The main considerations are size and weight (if you are static, then bigger is better) and straight or angled. The one bit of advice is to try before you buy where possible...
Good luck!
Thank you very much, I will certainly be having a look through these
 

Robinroe

Member
United Kingdom
This complete setup is good for the price
Thank you very much
 

William Lewis

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I'd agree you don't need to spend a lot to have see big advantage with a spotting scope at long range vs binoculars. I'd again recommend looking at the options opticron have to offer, I picked up a second hand opticron straight through scope for my first one many years ago and it was very useful before upgrading to an angled scope.

A tripod and fluid head is quite essential to get the best from them if your prepared to carry all of that with you. Doesn't need to break the bank to make a big difference. The initial wow factor with that type of set up at the lower end of the market is still quite amazing.

I found over the years that I tended to not bother carting around all the gear often unless I was going somewhere with quite expansive areas to observe so do bare that in mind - the best scope is the one your prepared to carry all the time. I use a swarovski ctc 30/75 as I can sling it in a bag with a monopod so it's always there when I need it but not in the way when I just walk out of my front door and don't want to cart around a mule pack.

I'd probably go for a conventional angled scope - 65/85mm aperture with a zoom eye piece as a first port of call and refine your preferences from there, most people use this type of set up for good reasons.
 

Robinroe

Member
United Kingdom
I'd agree you don't need to spend a lot to have see big advantage with a spotting scope at long range vs binoculars. I'd again recommend looking at the options opticron have to offer, I picked up a second hand opticron straight through scope for my first one many years ago and it was very useful before upgrading to an angled scope.

A tripod and fluid head is quite essential to get the best from them if your prepared to carry all of that with you. Doesn't need to break the bank to make a big difference. The initial wow factor with that type of set up at the lower end of the market is still quite amazing.

I found over the years that I tended to not bother carting around all the gear often unless I was going somewhere with quite expansive areas to observe so do bare that in mind - the best scope is the one your prepared to carry all the time. I use a swarovski ctc 30/75 as I can sling it in a bag with a monopod so it's always there when I need it but not in the way when I just walk out of my front door and don't want to cart around a mule pack.

I'd probably go for a conventional angled scope - 65/85mm aperture with a zoom eye piece as a first port of call and refine your preferences from there, most people use this type of set up for good reasons.
Thank you , very useful information.
 

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