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Mallorca 2021 (4 Viewers)

honeym

Well-known member
Yes, unfortunate Martin.
I’m not big on the correct pronunciations of words but just for the record, s’Albufera is pronounced:
“Sa bufera “, the “L” being silent.
I’m looking forward to the improvement to the quality of the water that the expansion will provide.
It’s such good news when much of what I read about is the destruction of habitat and wildlife.
Refreshing.
Mike
Hi Mike
The name derives from the time of the Moors when it was known as “al-buhayra” (lagoon or small sea).
Martin
 

Mike Montier

Well-known member
Thanks Martin,
I always like a bit of history.
There is something magical about being on the marsh at dusk. Lots of calling birds, Flamingoes flying across a setting sun followed by raptors coming into the reeds to roost.
Before the main event there were 6 Grey plovers, a couple of Curlew, 3 Dunlin and many Avocets.
Marsh harriers seemed to be everywhere but an accurate count is very difficult as they move around a lot before settling.
Then came the bird I had hoped for, a splendid male Hen Harrier floated into view. What beautiful birds they are.
Mike
 

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ggshrike

Well-known member
Yellowhammers are still being seen here and there.
Considering that it is still an official rarity in Mallorca, this year must have broken all records.
I think the first one was seen by Mirella in Cala d’Or, then Biel found five or so near Galatzó followed by a large group in Orient. Numbers varied but up to 20 were reported. Two have recently been seen in Santa Ponça.
I have been walking many parts of the Island recently and there are many very suitable sites where few birders would ever go so I can’t even guess at how many came during the invasion.
I find invasive species fascinating because you just never know which species will be next.
It’s a pity though that this year there are virtually no reports of Hawfinch or Brambling, they add a splash of excitement during winter birding.
Mike
Yellowhammers becoming increasingly difficult to find over here - particularly during lockdown!
 

honeym

Well-known member
Strange as it may seem, one was reported from my local patch during lockdown. Last record (that I'm aware of) was in 2006!
Pleased to hear Blackcap singing in my back garden this morning on a chilly but sunny day, one of an over-wintering pair.
Martin
 

Mike Montier

Well-known member
Ah, it was the first Willow Warbler in the spring that never failed to bring tears to my eyes.

I hope Pep posts his great find today of three Lesser kestrels at Maristany.
I am very pleased to hear of this record. I have often found early migrants only to be told they are too early and thus they are met with sceptisism.
Birds do the strangest things.
Mike.
 

StewB

Well-known member
Ah, it was the first Willow Warbler in the spring that never failed to bring tears to my eyes.

I hope Pep posts his great find today of three Lesser kestrels at Maristany.
I am very pleased to hear of this record. I have often found early migrants only to be told they are too early and thus they are met with sceptisism.
Birds do the strangest things.
Mike.
There’s been so many singing chiffchaffs around Norfolk over the last couple of days that they can’t all have been wintering birds - there must be arrivals among them. Given that stone curlews are back in the Brecks and there’s been Northern Wheatear, sand martins and little ringed plovers already, we are surely seeing some very early migration. So, it wouldn’t be surprising if things were happening equally early further South with you guys.

Stew
 
After other species advanced to the normal date arriving, today we have seen 3 lesser kestrel over Maristany, leaving to North.
The pictures are so bad, because at the beggining we though the first two were common kestrel, but when a third went into scene, all the alarms triggered!
Quickly tried to get pictures but they were far away, and yes, they were lesser kestrel, very very early arriving here.
 

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Mike Montier

Well-known member
Well done Pep. A great record.
Interesting to see the protruding central tail feathers. I have occasionally seen this feature on Common Kestrel but not as pronounced as on most Lessers, so it’s not a reliable ID feature.
Nevertheless, it’s a good pointer although clearly the grey panel on the upper wing is diagnostic.
Females are much more difficult.
A super sighting of some super-early birds. Great stuff.
Mike
 

Mike Montier

Well-known member
Hi Phil. Very rare indeed.
Cream-coloured Courser is right up there with my most wanted birds, I’ve never seen one. Every time I see photos, I’m dazzled at just how beautiful they are.
Maybe one day.
Mike
 

Mike Montier

Well-known member
Haha! I might give that a go.
I hope Roman doesn’t mind me posting his photo.
What a beauty. I’m dribbling.
 

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Mike Montier

Well-known member
A full day today walking the valley down from the monastery at Lluc.
If there is a more beautiful walk in Mallorca, I don’t know it.
The sky seemed constantly full of both Black and Griffon vultures and Booted Eagles and Red kites joined them.
Nice to get Blue tit on the year list, they are surprisingly localised in Mallorca.
A pair of Griffon vultures appeared to be nesting which is good news.
Mike
 

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Mike Montier

Well-known member
Today is a Bank Holiday and tomorrow the bars and restaurants reopen so there will be a sense of normality returning to Mallorca.
Only terraces will be opened but it’s progress.
The vaccination programme is going very slowly so it will be a long time before we receive ours. Most of our friends in the UK have had their jabs so we are far behind.
The migration watch at the tower, Albercutx, has already begun and there has been some movement observed.
It’s always a time of the year filled with anticipation, we are all wondering what the passage of raptors will be like so let’s hope for big numbers and a few surprises.
Alpine accentors are still being seen on the high bits and many other winter visitors have either left or will be on their way soon.
I will of course post all the news that I get.
Mike
 

Mike Montier

Well-known member
This is the view from the tower, overlooking Pollença and Alcudia bays.
It’s normally possible to see the raptors approaching from far away and as the excitement builds, they often fly right overhead and away to the north.
The atmosphere is electric. Well, unless it’s cold, windy and with no birds, which it sometimes is.
Mike
 

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Mike Montier

Well-known member
Good numbers of Red-rumped swallows being seen at various locations, Maristany is a good place as is Bassa de Can Guidet.
There were three at Salobrar de Campos the other evening too.
Mike
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
This is the view from the tower, overlooking Pollença and Alcudia bays.
It’s normally possible to see the raptors approaching from far away and as the excitement builds, they often fly right overhead and away to the north.
The atmosphere is electric. Well, unless it’s cold, windy and with no birds, which it sometimes is.
Mike
As someone with a major weakness for raptor migration watching and migration in general, this is a place I would dream of visiting! Thanks for the photo Mike, I really enjoy the thread.
 

honeym

Well-known member
Nice to get Blue tit on the year list, they are surprisingly localised in Mallorca.

Mike
Hi Mike
It was always said that they were 'only' up in the mountains, but we hired a villa near Pollenca one year and had Blue Tits regularly in the 'garden' - digging larvae out of the terminal shoots of almonds, etc.
Martin
 

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