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Mallorca 2024 (3 Viewers)

With Chris on holidaymaker duties, I set out this morning to mop up some of the local sites that I haven’t yet visited on this trip.

I walked the Can Cuarassa track and found at least three Spotless Starlings on and around the roof of Pins 16. Stone Curlews were calling, and I saw Corn Buntings and a Woodchat. Interesting (for me at least) was picking out a Bath White among the Small White and Clouded Yellow butterflies.

At Maristany I found the water levels unusually high. There were seven Greater Flamingoes on the main pool, plus a Purple Gallinule, and three Marbled Ducks which flew in and landed at the back of the pool. As usual, there were lots of Dabchicks, many with young.

En route to Son Bosc I scraped my memory to find the “horse paddocks”, and gratifyingly there were at least four Bee Eaters in the bushes and trees at the back of the field. Although the views were distant they were as spectacular as ever, and their calls carried across too!

I couldn’t find any Tree Sparrows at the Bus Depot, but a stop at the electricity sub-station along the Son Bosc road produced two more Bee Eaters, hawking from the telegraph wires.

The Depuradora didn’t produce anything outstanding, but a Shelduck crèche held at least 60 youngsters. There were at least three broods of Pochard, and a Little Stint and a Little Ringed Plover, a Purple Heron and a Glossy Ibis made up the numbers.

A Nightingale was singing strongly from the tree next to the platform at S’Amarador and two Great Reed Warblers were engaged in a singing competition from reed tops across the pool.

Dragonflies at the sluice at Sa Font we’re really good. Three or four Norfolk Hawkers were patrolling, Broad Scarlets, Keeled and Black-tailed Skimmers were dashing around and a female Emperor put in a brief appearance. Both Goblet-marked and Small Red-eyed damselflies were in evidence, but best of all I found a single Small Red Damselfly - only the second time I have found them in 25 years of visiting the island.

I finished with a stroll along Sa Font past the orchards in yet another fruitless search for Common Waxbill. It’s been some years since I have found them here - has anyone seen them recently?

Stew
 

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Spent this morning at Cap Blanc in search of Blue Rock Thrush and I wasn't disappointed. As soon as I arrived I found a pair up on a couple of old telegraph poles, plus a couple more on the cliff and possibly another single male by the main path to the lighthouse. I spent ages trying to get a decent photo then one by the cliff decided to pose nicely for me and kept coming back for more. Other birds seen were Thekla's Lark, Tawney Pipit, Hoopoe, Peregrine, Yellow-legged Gull, Shag, Serin, Linnet, Greenfinch, Med Flycatcher, Sardinian Warbler and I heard at least one Turtle Dove but couldn't locate it and a Nightingale.
Lovely photos,Steve (y)(y)
 
Home now after a week in Cala San Vicente. Saw the usual things, but in smaller numbers than on our usual earlier May visits. Didn't go to any wetlands apart from La Gola, which was very quiet. It's lovely to hear Nightingales in good numbers.

Walked up to the gate in the Ternelles Valley for the first time and saw our first positively id'd Griffon Vulture over the ridge. Also some dragonflies (Broad Scarlet and Black-tailed Skimmer in the photo), and a plant we still can't identify. Any suggestions welcome ... there are a few plants just before the gate, and at least one in the dry river bed.
 

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I popped out for my regular Sunday pre-breakfast walk at the Salobrar – I am beginning to think I could write my check list of species before I go out, it would save time! Although there were no great surprises, I was treated among other things to a spectacular flight of flamingos, common and spotted redshank, a lonely ringed plover and what I first took to be quail but I am now fairly sure were juvenile red-legged partridge. Oh well.

Mallorca-20240609-40-Enhanced-NR.jpg Mallorca-20240609-82-Enhanced-NR.jpg Mallorca-20240609-128-Enhanced-NR.jpg
 
After dropping Mrs B and Carey in Pollenca for the Sunday market, Chris and I parked near the Roman Bridge and walked up the Ternelles Approaches as far as the security gates and back.

We were still only about halfway up at about 9.25am when vultures began appearing. Clearly they were leaving the roost and our first group of 13 birds were mainly Black, but included at least 3 Griffons. For the next hour or so we could usually find an airborne vulture or two, with up to another 3 Griffons and 7 Black (double-counting a distinct possibility though).

Our next big surprise was a group of four Honey Buzzards (9.45am), which appeared above the northern ridges and were lost to view heading SE-ish. The photos are pretty rubbish, but hopefully convincing!

Elsewhere on our walk we saw a nice family party of Blue Tits, and saw and heard Crossbills and Serins. I managed to get a half-descent photo of a Hummingbird Hawk Moth, but failed to photograph a Monarch butterfly which was over some roadside rough ground.

Dragonflies had become active by the time we returned, with the usual suspects in evidence including a nice male Orange-winged Dropwing on the second tank. Also there, a Viperine Snake was lying in wait, but quickly retreated into its hideyhole in the wall when it noticed us.

After lunch we went to check out the dragonflies at Cami Volantina. There were plenty of Violet Dropwings, Broad Scarlets and Keeled Skimmers, as well as a few Blue-tailed Damselflies. Of interest we also saw a Red-eared Slider, two large eels and a couple of invasive Atlantic Blue Crabs.

We made a quick visit to Can Cuarassa so that Chris could catch up with the Spotless Starlings on the roof of Pins 16 (we saw two), and then we went to Cala St Vicenc and did the Fishermen’s Walk. On balance this was a bit of a mistake. It was quite a long walk over rough rocky paths in a strong wind and the heat of the day. We managed to connect with a Blue Rock Thrush and we saw a Striped Grayling butterfly on our way back. The saving grace was seeing ten or so Scopoli’s Shearwaters off the point just past the quarry.

Stew
 

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With Chris on holidaymaker duties, I set out this morning to mop up some of the local sites that I haven’t yet visited on this trip.

I walked the Can Cuarassa track and found at least three Spotless Starlings on and around the roof of Pins 16. Stone Curlews were calling, and I saw Corn Buntings and a Woodchat. Interesting (for me at least) was picking out a Bath White among the Small White and Clouded Yellow butterflies.

At Maristany I found the water levels unusually high. There were seven Greater Flamingoes on the main pool, plus a Purple Gallinule, and three Marbled Ducks which flew in and landed at the back of the pool. As usual, there were lots of Dabchicks, many with young.

En route to Son Bosc I scraped my memory to find the “horse paddocks”, and gratifyingly there were at least four Bee Eaters in the bushes and trees at the back of the field. Although the views were distant they were as spectacular as ever, and their calls carried across too!

I couldn’t find any Tree Sparrows at the Bus Depot, but a stop at the electricity sub-station along the Son Bosc road produced two more Bee Eaters, hawking from the telegraph wires.

The Depuradora didn’t produce anything outstanding, but a Shelduck crèche held at least 60 youngsters. There were at least three broods of Pochard, and a Little Stint and a Little Ringed Plover, a Purple Heron and a Glossy Ibis made up the numbers.

A Nightingale was singing strongly from the tree next to the platform at S’Amarador and two Great Reed Warblers were engaged in a singing competition from reed tops across the pool.

Dragonflies at the sluice at Sa Font we’re really good. Three or four Norfolk Hawkers were patrolling, Broad Scarlets, Keeled and Black-tailed Skimmers were dashing around and a female Emperor put in a brief appearance. Both Goblet-marked and Small Red-eyed damselflies were in evidence, but best of all I found a single Small Red Damselfly - only the second time I have found them in 25 years of visiting the island.

I finished with a stroll along Sa Font past the orchards in yet another fruitless search for Common Waxbill. It’s been some years since I have found them here - has anyone seen them recently?

Stew
Hi Stew, where abouts are the horse paddocks at the Dep? I vaguely remember being told last summer but never got there. Many thanks, Steve
 
Home now after a week in Cala San Vicente. Saw the usual things, but in smaller numbers than on our usual earlier May visits. Didn't go to any wetlands apart from La Gola, which was very quiet. It's lovely to hear Nightingales in good numbers.

Walked up to the gate in the Ternelles Valley.Any suggestions welcome ... there are a few plants just before the gate, and at least one in the dry river bed.
It's a dilemma...best I came up with is Delphinium staphisagria type but hard to tell..sorry
 
Hi Stew, where abouts are the horse paddocks at the Dep? I vaguely remember being told last summer but never got there. Many thanks, Steve
Take the last right turn before the bus depot as you approach from Can Picafort (look out for the sign, below). Drive down the road until just before the first house on the right (c 0.5km). Look across the paddock on your right to the trees and bushes at the back.

Good luck!

Stew
 

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Take the last right turn before the bus depot as you approach from Can Picafort (look out for the sign, below). Drive down the road until just before the first house on the right (c 0.5km). Look across the paddock on your right to the trees and bushes at the back.

Good luck!

Stew
Thank you (y)
 
It's a dilemma...best I came up with is Delphinium staphisagria type but hard to tell..sorry
Thanks for that - seems to be correct, if complicated! Wikipedia says:

There are three species in Staphisagria:[1]
Staphisagria macrosperma Spach = Delphinium staphisagria L.
Staphisagria requienii (DC.) Spach = Delphinium requienii DC.
Staphisagria picta (Willd.) Jabbour = Delphinium pictum Willd.
Or two, as some botanists think S. requienii and S. picta should be united as one species, with S. picta treated as S. requienii subsp. picta.[3]

And I found this site ...


Regards,

Pancho44
 
This morning Chris and I walked the Bocquer Valley, setting out at about 8.15 in the hope of beating the crowds and perhaps catching a Balearic Warbler before the day heated up. In the event the outward walk was literally very quiet. We heard a couple of brief bursts of Blue Rock Thrush song, and Crag Martins were in evidence all the way along. We spent over an hour at the far end around the top of the slope and the hillside to the right of the path down, but didn’t have a sniff of a Balearic Warbler - most disappointing.

Two Eleanora’s appeared over the western ridge, but quickly moved on. A pale Booted Eagle was the highlight, crossing the valley just after we set out for the return. A Blue Rock Thrush was perched on one of the “guard stones” at the valley entrance. By this time (11am-ish) there was a steady stream of walkers heading out along the valley. A Hoopoe was under the avenue of pines across the bypass.

After lunch we did a gentle stroll through to La Gola with our better halves. Another walk with few birds to show, but I was really pleased to see a Monarch butterfly on flowers along the Puerto Pollenca sea front.

Stew
 

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Just returned home after a very relaxing family break.
In addition to the day out I had birding earlier in the week, I did manage to get up to Castell de Santueri (on the premise of seeing nice views!), where I enjoyed great views of Alpine Swift at eye level.
Also there, was a family party of Peregrines and a singing Blue Rock Thrush.

With last week and the trip last month (that was specifically for birding), I've managed 108 species on Mallorca this year, which doesn't seem like bad going.
It was great to meet some of the Bird Forum regulars along the way, and hopefully it won't be too long before I get the chance to return!
 
Moved from C'an Pastilla to Port de Pollenca today and on the drive over popped in to s'Amarador for a quick look. From the tower at least two Great Reed Warblers' could ne heard calling but not seen and a Nightingale was sinning from the tree at the bottom of the tower. At least 2 juvenile Kestrel were being fed at a nest box and a distant Booted Eagle was noted. Then on to Son Bosc and a look for Bee-eater near the paddock. Thanks to Stew for directions, the paddock was found and 4 birds were noted in the distant bushes. Then, driving up the main track to the Dep, a Bee-eater was seen close to the road on the wires, and was joined by 2 more. On the way back they were seen again, this time on the fence, then flew off. At the Dep itself, not too much of note other than 7 Marbled Duck.
 

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This morning Chris and I walked the Bocquer Valley, setting out at about 8.15 in the hope of beating the crowds and perhaps catching a Balearic Warbler before the day heated up. In the event the outward walk was literally very quiet. We heard a couple of brief bursts of Blue Rock Thrush song, and Crag Martins were in evidence all the way along. We spent over an hour at the far end around the top of the slope and the hillside to the right of the path down, but didn’t have a sniff of a Balearic Warbler - most disappointing.

Two Eleanora’s appeared over the western ridge, but quickly moved on. A pale Booted Eagle was the highlight, crossing the valley just after we set out for the return. A Blue Rock Thrush was perched on one of the “guard stones” at the valley entrance. By this time (11am-ish) there was a steady stream of walkers heading out along the valley. A Hoopoe was under the avenue of pines across the bypass.

After lunch we did a gentle stroll through to La Gola with our better halves. Another walk with few birds to show, but I was really pleased to see a Monarch butterfly on flowers along the Puerto Pollenca sea front.

Stew
Interesting, I was hoping to go up the Boquer this week in search of Balearic's, a species I still haven't found after several attempts at different locations. Crag Martin would be nice life tick though. I'm staying just over the road from the start of the path so no excuses for a walk, unless Mrs W has other ideas.:unsure:
 
Hello Mallorca Fans,
we are visiting next week. I basically have one target left which is Mediterrenean Flycatcher, whcih shouldnt be too difficult I guess. But anyway it is better to get some backup intel.

We are staying near Son Carrio / Manacor. Anyone has a good site for the flycatcher in the South East?

Thank you very much.
 
After seeing Chris and his partner off to the airport this morning, Mrs B and I went for posh coffee and cake on the terrace of the Hotel Llenaire. As well as enjoying the spectacular views of the bay, we heard two Wrynecks calling, one of which obligingly flew across the terrace. Two Red Kites were over the fields below and a very smart male Serin was singing from a nearby tree.

After lunch I drove out to the Central Plain (“Es Blanquer”), where I spent a fairly productive hour and a half before the rain started. I spent time at three different fairly random spots and saw three Black Vultures, two Booted Eagles, a Marsh Harrier, lots of Red Kites and Kestrels. I managed to pick out a male Lesser Kestrel which, although distant, obligingly sat in a tree to dismember some prey, allowing me to get it in the scope.

I also had a singing Short-toed Lark, four Corn Buntings, and both Woodchat Shrike and Fantailed Warbler collecting food, presumably to feed their young.

Stew
 
Hello Mallorca Fans,
we are visiting next week. I basically have one target left which is Mediterrenean Flycatcher, whcih shouldnt be too difficult I guess. But anyway it is better to get some backup intel.

We are staying near Son Carrio / Manacor. Anyone has a good site for the flycatcher in the South East?

Thank you very much.
Shouldn't have too much trouble, I was told here that any "spotted" flycatcher found on the island this time of year should be a Med, with all the Spotted's having passed through on migration. Good luck trying to tell the difference though.
 

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