• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Maluridae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Andrew Black, Leo Joseph, Lynn Pedler, Graham Carpenter, 2010. A taxonomic framework for interpreting evolution within the Amytornis textilis-modestus complex of grasswrens. Emu, In Press.
Abstract
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Amy C. Driskell, Janette A. Norman, Stephen Pruett-Jones, Elizabeth Mangall, Sarah Sonsthagen, Les Christidis, 2011. A multigene phylogeny examining evolutionary and ecological relationships in the Australo-Papuan wrens of the subfamily Malurinae (Aves). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Accepted Manuscript.
Abstract
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Andrew Black, 2011. Subspecies of the Thick-Billed Grasswren Amytornis modestus (Aves-Maluridae). Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Volume 135, Number 1, May 2011 , pp. 26-38(13).
Abstract
 

Murray Lord

Well-known member
Andrew Black, 2011. Subspecies of the Thick-Billed Grasswren Amytornis modestus (Aves-Maluridae). Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Volume 135, Number 1, May 2011 , pp. 26-38(13).
Abstract

The same author has published another paper on the Western Grasswren (i.e. western forms of Thick billed under older taxonomy). Details are:

Western Australia, home of the Grass-Wren (Amytornis textilis) Amytornis 3: 1-12 (2011)

Abstract: The first grasswrens to be seen by Europeans, at Shark Bay, were given the English name Textile Wren, later the Grass-Wren. Though detected subsequently in many other places in southern Western Australia they then declined dramatically and soon disappeared from all but the place of their original discovery. Specimens collected many hundreds of kilometres apart and in varying environments showed differences that led to their being given many separate names. They were shortly dispersed among Australian and later among North American institutions with none having a fully representative collection. Subsequent extinctions restricted the opportunity to confirm or modify this implicit taxonomic diversity. From evidence presented here I propose that two Western Australian subspecies be recognised as separate, Amytornis textilis textilis of the Shark Bay region and arid northern interior and A. t. macrourus of southern eucalypt communities.

Full text available here
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Superb Fairywren

Dudaniec, Schlotfeldt, Bertozzi, Donnellan & Kleindorfer. Genetic and morphological divergence in island and mainland birds: Informing conservation priorities. Biol Conserv: in press. [abstract]
 

Daniel Philippe

Well-known member
Lee, J. Y., L. Joseph & S. V. Edwards, 2011. A species tree for the Australo-Papuan fairy-wrens and allies (Aves: Maluridae). Syst. Biol. In press

Abstract. -We explored the efficacy of species tree methods at the family level in birds, using the Australo-Papuan Fairy-wrens (Passeriformes: Maluridae) as a model system. Fairy-wrens of the genus Malurus are known for high intensities of sexual selection, resulting in some cases in rapid speciation. This history suggests that incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) of neutrally evolving loci could be substantial, a situation that could compromise traditional methods of combining loci in phylogenetic analysis. Using eighteen molecular markers (5 anonymous loci, 7 exons, 5 introns and one mtDNA locus), we show that gene tree monophyly across species could be rejected for 16 out of 18 loci, suggesting substantial ILS at the family level in these birds. Using the software Concaterpillar, we also detect three statistically distinct clusters of gene trees among the 18 loci. Despite substantial variation in gene trees, species trees constructed using four different species tree estimation methods (BEST, BUCKy, and STAR) were generally well-supported and similar to each other and to the concatenation tree, with a few mild discordances at nodes that could be explained by rapid and recent speciation events. By contrast, minimizing deep coalescences (MDC) produced a species tree that was topologically more divergent from those of the other methods as measured by multidimensional scaling of trees. Additionally, gene and species trees were topologically more similar in the BEST analysis, presumably because of the species tree prior employed in BEST which appropriately assumes that gene trees are correlated with each other and with the species tree. Among the 18 loci we also discovered 102 independent indel markers, which also proved phylogenetically informative, primarily among genera, and displayed a ~4-fold bias towards deletions. As suggested in earlier work, the grasswrens (Amytornis) are sister to the rest of the family, and the emu-wrens (Stipiturus) are sister to fairywrens (Malurus, Clytomias). Our study shows that ILS is common at the family level in birds yet, despite this, species tree methods converge on broadly similar results for this family.
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Chestnut-shouldered fairywrens

Forthcoming...
  • McLean, Toon, Schmidt, Joseph & Hughes (in press). Speciation in chestnut-shouldered fairy-wrens (Malurus spp.) and rapid phenotypic divergence in Variegated Fairy-wrens (Malurus lamberti): a multilocus approach. Mol Phylogenet Evol.
    CSIRO.
 

MJB

Well-known member
Forthcoming...
  • McLean, Toon, Schmidt, Joseph & Hughes (in press). Speciation in chestnut-shouldered fairy-wrens (Malurus spp.) and rapid phenotypic divergence in Variegated Fairy-wrens (Malurus lamberti): a multilocus approach. Mol Phylogenet Evol.
    CSIRO.

Richard,
From the number of papers that Leo Joseph writes, co-authors or encourages, it's clear that Antipodean ornithology is a thriving branch of CSIRO, which punches way above its weight. (And long may it be so, but if Tony Abbott (Budgie-smuggler) can take advantage of the disorganisation in the ruling Labor Party, he may well put into action his suggestion that climate science can be disregarded...)
MJB
 
Last edited:

Dimitris

Birdwatcher in Oz
Forthcoming...
  • McLean, Toon, Schmidt, Joseph & Hughes (in press). Speciation in chestnut-shouldered fairy-wrens (Malurus spp.) and rapid phenotypic divergence in Variegated Fairy-wrens (Malurus lamberti): a multilocus approach. Mol Phylogenet Evol.
    CSIRO.

Oooh. That's a good one. Always was interested in this species... also I should be seeing Chestnut-shouldered soonish :).
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Delhey et al

Delhey, Hall, Kingma & Peters (in press). Increased conspicuousness can explain the match between visual sensitivities and blue plumage colours in fairy-wrens. Proc R Soc B. [abstract] [pdf]
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Joseph et al

Forthcoming...

Joseph, Edwards & McLean (in press). The Maluridae: inferring avian biology and evolutionary history from DNA sequences. Emu. [abstract]
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Red-backed Fairywren

Baldassarre, Thomassen, Karubian & Webster 2013. The role of ecological variation in driving divergence of sexual and non-sexual traits in the red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus). BMC Evol Biol 13(75). [abstract] [pdf]
 
Warning! This thread is more than 2 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top