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Marsh Warbler Gosport Hampshire? (1 Viewer)

Matt Eade

Well-known member
I spent ten hrs yesterday listening to a marsh wrb at Sammy's Point, Easington. I have singing reed wrbs on my local patch that I hear on a daily basis. That video is a reed wrb singing. Can discuss the appearance till the cows come home but doesn't alter the song

Hi Nick,

I'm hoping you don't think that I believe the Gosport bird is a Marsh, which it clearly isn't. I was just comparing the obvious differences from the Otmoor Marsh.

For the record, it's a Reed Warbler.

All the best
 

Nick Smith

Member of the Staffordshire Bird Club
Hi Nick,

I'm hoping you don't think that I believe the Gosport bird is a Marsh, which it clearly isn't. I was just comparing the obvious differences from the Otmoor Marsh.

For the record, it's a Reed Warbler.

All the best

No. It was directed at those who think its a marsh. I watched the otmoor video before I posted aswell.
 

West End Birder

Well-known member
Firstly to JSB apologies it was more a tongue in cheek comment to stop the debate.

A few hours ago I set up three videos a Reed Warbler, a Marsh Warbler and the Gosport Warbler (acrocephalus rorybremnerius) and tried to make the GW an MW but just could not, it has to be a Reed Warbler surely? The only thing is that one photo I saw to my uneducated eye but comparing with an identification paper was that the primary projection looked longish, but as I say it is to my uneducated eye.

I am quite surprised that this bird has caused so much debate, as a real amateur I think I am actually disappointed that the ID is still (apparently) in question (whatever it is).

One potentially really stupid question - do they interbreed at all?

Thanks for the comments all
 

Jane Turner

Well-known member
Marsh warblers arrive with very fresh, recently moulted flight feathers, Reed Warblers with very worn ones.
 

West End Birder

Well-known member
How interesting. Is that because of the time of year they moult (I assume) or do they have a more traumatic journey (customs, immigration etc)?

So assuming it is a Reed and all the nails have lined up, why are so many people convinced it is a Marsh Warbler? I find it odd that there is a debate about this, normally these two are easily separated aren't they? (I confess I wouldn't know but in my experience there is never any doubt about which is which).

All very odd, perhaps it is the Gosport effect ;-)
 

Jane Turner

Well-known member
Have a read through this.... http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=58096&highlight=Frodsham

and get some popcorn.

It was accepted as a Reed Warbler

and yes its timing

Marsh: Complete moult pre-breeding, flight feathers completed late march to late April

Reed: Usually replaces flight feathers in Sept-Dec


So very worn tertials suggests they were last replaced last autumn..... and old worn feathers often make a bird look paler and less rusty anyway.
 
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Jane Turner

Well-known member
The inescpable fact is that the 3rd pp emargination is where it should be for a Reed Warbler... the blue arrow is where a Marsh should be
 

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Hobbes2

Well-known member
The inescpable fact is that the 3rd pp emargination is where it should be for a Reed Warbler... the blue arrow is where a Marsh should be

I have been following this thread with interest and this is a very helpful illustration Jane. If you look at Jim Wood's shot of a Marsh Warbler on Shetland here: http://www.birdforum.net/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=460863 you can see where the 3rd pp emargination finishes - just as Jane illustrated.
Thanks
Hobbes
 

Jane Turner

Well-known member
You can also see that the tertials are not overlapping the secondaries (as they do on marsh warbler including the one above)
 

Jane Turner

Well-known member
Here is a direct comparison of the two birds - you can see the 3rd pp emargination in the field if you look for it. I find it harder to see the tertials
 

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