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Mauritius Weaver (1 Viewer)

Steve.Jonesy

Well-known member
I took this pic Nov 2017 Black River Gorges NP.
I think it’s a female Weaver but not sure what kind
Can you help?
Thanks
 

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alanc

Just an earthbound misfit
England
That looks like a female Red-billed Quelea. I think these have been introduced to Reunion but i don't know if they have reached Mauritius yet. Others will no doubt know
cheers alan
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
That looks like a female Red-billed Quelea. I think these have been introduced to Reunion but i don't know if they have reached Mauritius yet. Others will no doubt know
cheers alan

Have to admit doesn't scream quelea for me. Lower bill colour off and looks too chunky in my view
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
Scotland
Madagascar (or other intro) Fody?

I’ll be more definite this time. The thick bill, yellow on the face and hint on the wings point to Village Weaver rather than either fody found on Mauritius. Not that I have any experience of fodies but I have seen a few Village Weavers.

David
 
It's red / Madagascar / common fody - lots of experience with both species having spent five field seasons working in Mauritius. Both are common on Mauritius.
 

Muso

Well-known member
Scotland
Attached pic is pair of Village Weavers taken in Mauritius in 2018. I can see similarities, especially given there will be variances, but seems more yellow in my pic...?
 

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david kelly

Drive-by Birder
Scotland
the red fody is smaller than the village weaver, the femle weaver got red eye.
so i think this is the fody.

Sometimes, the birds in Mauritius are of the South African subspecies and the SASOL Guide says that the female Village (Spotted-backed) Weavers there sometimes have red eyes. I first saw them in a garden in Harare and they were called Spotted-backed Weavers in the Southern African field guides back then.

David
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
Attached pic is pair of Village Weavers taken in Mauritius in 2018. I can see similarities, especially given there will be variances, but seems more yellow in my pic...?

The "female" of the pair is apparently an immature/non-breeding male, but perhaps Tib can confirm this. The OP bird is clearly a Fody.
 

Brian J Small

Well-known member
Going against the tide of opinion here, but I am trying to reconcile the structure of this with a fody.

The bill looks pretty hefty to me and the tail long; the white tips to the median coverts are not neat blobs, but more like that of a weaver; the greater coverts have a more typical weaver pattern with uniform white or yellowish edges, and lacks the white tips that creat the g. cov. wingbar of a fody; the emarginations are strong and slightly arced.

Happy to be contradicted, but I am struggling with fody.

Brian S
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
Brian, the most important feature here separating a Fody from a Ploceus is the crown spotting, imo. Ploceus females, immatures and eclipse plumage males never have spotting on the crown, and I believe this is extensive to all Ploceus species. This bird shows spotting organized in two bands on the sides of the crown, being slightly paler and less spotted on the centre of the crown, which is exactly the pattern present on a Fody. Additionally Euplectes weavers have much heavier crown spotting than this. The angle of this photo is not the best to see the spotting (because the feathers are slightly reflecting, attenuating the contrasts), but it is there.
 

Muso

Well-known member
Scotland
The "female" of the pair is apparently an immature/non-breeding male, but perhaps Tib can confirm this. The OP bird is clearly a Fody.

LOL - never crossed my mind that this wasn't a pair...thanks for the info Rafael, and for being gentle with my ignorance. It seems the more I learn, the less I know...
 

Tib78

Well-known member
The "female" of the pair is apparently an immature/non-breeding male, but perhaps Tib can confirm this. The OP bird is clearly a Fody.

I am afraid you put to much faith in my abilities, Rafael ;) .
More seriously though I think it is a female as the eye doesn’t look so red, beside, why would a certain individual be in full breeding plumage while another on is in non-breeding plumage?
As to ruling out a younger male, I won’t even try!

Going against the tide of opinion here, but I am trying to reconcile the structure of this with a fody.

The bill looks pretty hefty to me and the tail long; the white tips to the median coverts are not neat blobs, but more like that of a weaver; the greater coverts have a more typical weaver pattern with uniform white or yellowish edges, and lacks the white tips that creat the g. cov. wingbar of a fody; the emarginations are strong and slightly arced.

Happy to be contradicted, but I am struggling with fody.

Brian S

Brian,

The bill looks unusually hefty, I admit. On the other hand, the longish tail surely is better for a Fody than a weaver.
But one simply need to look at the mantle to definitely rule out Village weaver: it is way too contrasty with neat black centers and sharply contrasting pale edges. This pattern may be found in some species of weavers but not in Village. Also the head should practically always appear more yellowish in Village weaver, even in juveniles. And finally the legs are rather darkish reddish (as opposed to bright pink).

PS: I have been sorry to hear of the sad demise of Limosa via Andrea. I do hope things will better for everyone.
 
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